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A Comparative Study of Segregation Patterns in Belgium, Denmark, the Netherlands and Sweden: Neighbourhood Concentration and Representation of Non-European Migrants
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Human Geography.
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Human Geography.
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Number of Authors: 62018 (English)In: European Journal of Population, ISSN 0168-6577, E-ISSN 1572-9885, Vol. 34, no 2, p. 251-275Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In this paper, we use geo-coded, individual-level register data on four European countries to compute comparative measures of segregation that are independent of existing geographical sub-divisions. The focus is on non-European migrants, for whom aggregates of egocentric neighbourhoods (with different population counts) are used to assess small-scale, medium-scale, and large-scale segregation patterns. At the smallest scale level, corresponding to neighbourhoods with 200 persons, patterns of over- and under-representation are strikingly similar. At larger-scale levels, Belgium stands out as having relatively strong over- and under-representation. More than 55% of the Belgian population lives in large-scale neighbourhoods with moderate under- or over-representation of non-European migrants. In the other countries, the corresponding figures are between 30 and 40%. Possible explanations for the variation across countries are differences in housing policies and refugee placement policies. Sweden has the largest and Denmark the smallest non-European migrant population, in relative terms. Thus, in both migrant-dense and native-born-dense areas, Swedish neighbourhoods have a higher concentration and Denmark a lower concentration of non-European migrants than the other countries. For large-scale, migrant-dense neighbourhoods, however, levels of concentration are similar in Belgium, the Netherlands, and Sweden. Thus, to the extent that such concentrations contribute to spatial inequalities, these countries are facing similar policy challenges.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2018. Vol. 34, no 2, p. 251-275
Keywords [en]
Segregation, Comparison, Non-European immigrants, Concentration, Representation, Belgium, Denmark, The Netherlands, Sweden
National Category
Sociology International Migration and Ethnic Relations Human Geography
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-156620DOI: 10.1007/s10680-018-9481-5ISI: 000431302700005PubMedID: 29755158OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-156620DiVA, id: diva2:1210323
Available from: 2018-05-28 Created: 2018-05-28 Last updated: 2018-05-28Bibliographically approved

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