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Smoking and Physical Inactivity as Predictors of Mobility Impairment During Late Life: Exploring Differential Vulnerability Across Education Level in Sweden
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Aging Research Center (ARC), (together with KI).
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Aging Research Center (ARC), (together with KI).
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Aging Research Center (ARC), (together with KI).
Number of Authors: 42018 (English)In: The journals of gerontology. Series B, Psychological sciences and social sciences, ISSN 1079-5014, E-ISSN 1758-5368, Vol. 73, no 4, p. 675-683Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objectives: To test whether older adults from high and low educational groups are differentially vulnerable to the impact of smoking and physical inactivity on the progression of mobility impairment during old age.

Methods: A nationally representative sample of older Swedish adults (n = 1,311), aged 57-76 years at baseline (1991), were followed for up to 23 years (2014). Multilevel regression was used to estimate individual trajectories of mobility impairment over the study period and to test for differences in the progression of mobility impairment on the basis of smoking status, physical activity status, and level of education.

Results: Compared to nonsmokers, heavy smokers had higher levels and steeper increases in mobility impairment with advancing age. However, there were only small and statistically nonsignificant differences in the impact of heavy smoking on mobility impairment in high versus low education groups. A similar pattern of results was found for physical inactivity.

Discussion: Differential vulnerability to unhealthy behaviors may vary across populations, age, time-periods, and health outcomes. In this study of older adults in Sweden, low and high education groups did not differ significantly in their associations between heavy smoking or physical inactivity, and the progression of mobility impairment.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2018. Vol. 73, no 4, p. 675-683
Keywords [en]
Aging, Differential vulnerability, Education, Mobility, Physical inactivity, Smoking, Lack of exercise, Educational status, Elderly, Emotional vulnerability
National Category
Psychology Gerontology, specialising in Medical and Health Sciences Geriatrics
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-156651DOI: 10.1093/geronb/gbw090ISI: 000430700300018PubMedID: 27449220OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-156651DiVA, id: diva2:1213766
Available from: 2018-06-05 Created: 2018-06-05 Last updated: 2018-06-05Bibliographically approved

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The journals of gerontology. Series B, Psychological sciences and social sciences
PsychologyGerontology, specialising in Medical and Health SciencesGeriatrics

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