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In Pursuit of “Never Again”: A Philological Study of the Functional Possibilities of the Memoir in Post-war Bosnia and Herzegovina
Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
2018 (English)Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
Abstract [en]

This essay is based on a critical revision of the Scholars’ Initiative, a ten-year research project conducted by Charles Ingrao whose goal was to confront the controversies in former Yugoslav societies by creating a common, non-custom-made narrative of Balkan history. More specifically, this essay focuses on the revision of the scope, and methodology of the project. The former is limited to Bosnia and Herzegovina, whereas the latter includes the predominant use, and study of memoirs in the making of a common, transethnic narrative of the genocide. The goal with this revision is to highlight Ingrao’s partake in a century long tradition of suppressing Bosniak prosperity in Balkan societies, which has resulted in a scarcity of Bosniak literature. Ultimately, this essay focuses on the witness literature, which was produced in the aftermath of the genocide in Bosnia and Herzegovina in 1992-1995. More specifically, this essay uses Kemal Kurspahić’s As Long As Sarajevo Exists (1997), Wounded I Am More Awake (2012) by Esad Boškailo, and The Bosnia List: A Memoir of War, Exile, and Return (2014) by Kenan Trebinčević as springboards in arguing for the functional possibilities of the memoir genre in the creating of a common, transethnic narrative in post-war Bosnia and Herzegovina. To claim for the historiographical validity of the memoir, the impossibility of the singular narrative, and the poetic of responsibility, this essay makes use of Jacques Derrida’s Sovereignties in Question: The Poetics of Paul Celan. This essay also makes use of Gregory H. Stanton’s Ten Stages of Genocide as a way to demonstrate a model by which the common, transethnic narrative can be studied, and further explored. The ultimate goal with the critical study of Stanton’s stages is to qualify the memoir genre as an official genre of genocide research in post-war Bosnia and Herzegovina.

 

Keywords: Common, transethnic narrative; post-war Bosnia; genocide; testimony; history

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2018. , p. 43
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URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-157072OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-157072DiVA, id: diva2:1215305
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Available from: 2018-09-18 Created: 2018-06-08 Last updated: 2018-09-18Bibliographically approved

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