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Use of benzodiazepines and cognitive performance in primary care patients with first cognitive complaints
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Aging Research Center (ARC), (together with KI). Luigi Sacco Hospital, University of Milan, Italy.
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Aging Research Center (ARC), (together with KI). Catholic University of Rome, Italy.
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Number of Authors: 62018 (English)In: International psychogeriatrics, ISSN 1041-6102, E-ISSN 1741-203X, Vol. 30, no 4, p. 597-601Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The aim of the present study is to investigate the impact of benzodiazepine use on cognitive performance in primary care patients with first cognitive complaints. The association between the exposition to benzodiazepines (short and long half-life) and cognitive performance, evaluated through the Mini Mental State Examination (MMSE), was tested through analysis of the covariance and logistic regression models. Within the 4,249 participants (mean age 77.0 +/- 8.2, 66.4% women), 732 (17%) were on benzodiazepines. When compared with non-users, short- and long-acting benzodiazepine users presented overlapping adjusted MMSE mean scores (respectively, mean MMSE score: 25.3, 95%CI 25.2-25.5; 25.4, 95%CI 25.1-25.7, and 25.9, 95%CI 25.3-26.4; p = 0.156). When tested according to the logistical regression model, after adjusting for potential confounders, no association was found between short and long acting benzodiazepine use and a MMSE < 24 (respectively, OR 0.9, 95%CI 0.7-1.2; OR 0.8, 95%CI 0.7-1.3) as compared with non-users. In conclusion, according to the results of our study, benzodiazepine use seems not to impact on cognitive performance- as assessed with the MMSE- of primary care patients referring to GPs for first cognitive complaints.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2018. Vol. 30, no 4, p. 597-601
Keywords [en]
benzodiazepines, dementia, primary care, cognitive impairment, prevention
National Category
Geriatrics Psychiatry Psychology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-156745DOI: 10.1017/S104161021700223XISI: 000431404300016PubMedID: 29117880OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-156745DiVA, id: diva2:1219218
Available from: 2018-06-15 Created: 2018-06-15 Last updated: 2018-06-15Bibliographically approved

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