Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Tooth loss is associated with accelerated cognitive decline and volumetric brain differences: a population-based study
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Aging Research Center (ARC), (together with KI).
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Aging Research Center (ARC), (together with KI).
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Aging Research Center (ARC), (together with KI).
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Aging Research Center (ARC), (together with KI).
Show others and affiliations
Number of Authors: 82018 (English)In: Neurobiology of Aging, ISSN 0197-4580, E-ISSN 1558-1497, Vol. 67, p. 23-30Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Tooth loss has been related to cognitive impairment; however, its relation to structural brain differences in humans is unknown. Dementia-free participants (n = 2715) of age >= 60 years were followed up for up to 9 years. A subsample (n = 394) underwent magnetic resonance imaging at baseline. Information on tooth loss was collected at baseline, and cognitive function was assessed using the Mini-Mental State Examination at baseline and at follow-ups. Data were analyzed using linear mixed effects models and linear regression models. At baseline, 404 (14.9%) participants had partial tooth loss, and 206 (7.6%) had complete tooth loss. Tooth loss was significantly associated with a steeper cognitive decline (beta: -0.18, 95% confidence interval [CI]: -0.24 to -0.11) and remained significant after adjusting for or stratifying by potential confounders. In cross-sectional analyses, persons with complete or partial tooth loss had significantly lower total brain volume (beta: -28.89, 95% CI: -49.33 to -8.45) and gray matter volume (beta: -22.60, 95% CI: -38.26 to -6.94). Thus, tooth loss may be a risk factor for accelerated cognitive aging.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2018. Vol. 67, p. 23-30
Keywords [en]
Cohort study, Neuroimaging, Tooth loss, Cognitive aging, Gray matter
National Category
Basic Medicine Geriatrics
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-157643DOI: 10.1016/j.neurobiolaging.2018.03.003ISI: 000432625600004PubMedID: 29609079OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-157643DiVA, id: diva2:1227986
Available from: 2018-06-27 Created: 2018-06-27 Last updated: 2018-06-27Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text in DiVA

Other links

Publisher's full textPubMed
By organisation
Aging Research Center (ARC), (together with KI)
In the same journal
Neurobiology of Aging
Basic MedicineGeriatrics

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

doi
pubmed
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
pubmed
urn-nbn
Total: 3 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf