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Evolutionary and ecological traps for brown bears Ursus arctos in human-modified landscapes
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Number of Authors: 82018 (English)In: Mammal Review, ISSN 0305-1838, E-ISSN 1365-2907, Vol. 48, no 3, p. 180-193Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Evolutionary traps, and their derivative, ecological traps, occur when animals make maladaptive decisions based on seemingly reliable environmental cues, and are important mechanistic explanations for declines in animal populations. Despite the interest in large carnivore conservation in human-modified landscapes, the emergence of traps and their potential effects on the conservation of large carnivore populations has frequently been overlooked. The brown bear Ursus arctos typifies the challenges facing large carnivore conservation and recent research has reported that this species can show maladaptive behaviours in human-modified landscapes. Here we review, describe and discuss scenarios recognised as evolutionary or ecological traps for brown bears, and propose possible trap scenarios and mechanisms that have the potential to affect the dynamics and viability of brown bear populations. Six potential trap scenarios have been detected for brown bears in human-modified landscapes: 1) food resources close to human settlements; 2) agricultural landscapes; 3) roads; 4) artificial feeding sites; 5) hunting by humans; and 6) other human activities. Because these traps are likely to be of contrasting relevance for different demographic segments of bear populations, we highlight the importance of evaluations of the relative demographic consequences of different trap types for wildlife management. We also suggest that traps may be behind the decreases in brown bear and other large carnivore populations in human-modified landscapes.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2018. Vol. 48, no 3, p. 180-193
Keywords [en]
ecological traps, evolutionary traps, maladaptive decision, source-sink, Ursus arctos
National Category
Zoology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-157635DOI: 10.1111/mam.12123ISI: 000434229000004OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-157635DiVA, id: diva2:1228095
Available from: 2018-06-27 Created: 2018-06-27 Last updated: 2018-06-27Bibliographically approved

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Penteriani, VincenzoKrofel, MihaDalerum, Fredrik
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CiteExportLink to record
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  • apa
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