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Job demands, control and social support as predictors of trajectories of depressive symptoms
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute.
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute. Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Public Health Sciences.
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-8806-5698
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Number of Authors: 52018 (English)In: Journal of Affective Disorders, ISSN 0165-0327, E-ISSN 1573-2517, Vol. 235, p. 535-543Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Job demands, job control and social support have been associated with depressive symptoms. However, it is unknown how these work characteristics are associated with different trajectories of depressive symptoms, which this study aimed to examine. Methods: We included 6679 subjects in the Swedish Longitudinal Occupational Survey of Health (SLOSH), who completed biennial questionnaires in 2006-2016. Group-based trajectory models identified groups with similar development of depressive symptoms. Multinomial logistic regression estimated associations between baseline demands, control, social support and trajectories of depressive symptoms. Results: We identified six depression trajectories with varying severity and stability across four measurements. High job demands and low social support, but not low control, were associated with higher probability of belonging to subsequent trajectories with higher symptom level compared to very low symptom level. Adjusted risk ratios ranged from 1.26, 95% CI = 1.06-1.51 (low symptom trajectory) to 2.51, 95% CI = 1.43-4.41 (persistent severe symptom trajectory). Results also indicated that onset of high demands, low control and low social support increases depressive symptoms over time. Limitations: The results were based on self-reported data and all individuals did not have complete data in all waves. Conclusions: The results indicated that especially perceptions of high job demands and low social support are associated with higher or increasing levels of depressive symptoms over time. This support the supposition that high job demands, and low social support may have long-term consequences for depressive symptoms and that interventions targeting job demands and social support may contribute to a more favourable course of depression.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2018. Vol. 235, p. 535-543
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Psychiatry Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
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URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-157628DOI: 10.1016/j.jad.2018.04.067ISI: 000432686900077PubMedID: 29689506OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-157628DiVA, id: diva2:1228544
Available from: 2018-06-28 Created: 2018-06-28 Last updated: 2018-06-28Bibliographically approved

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Åhlin, Julia K.Rajaleid, KristiinaWesterlund, HugoMagnusson Hanson, Linda L.
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Stress Research InstituteDepartment of Public Health Sciences
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