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A decade lost: Does educational success mitigate the increased risks of premature death among children with experience of out-of-home care?
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Public Health Sciences.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-7576-9410
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Public Health Sciences.
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Public Health Sciences.
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2018 (English)In: Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

Background: Past research has consistently identified children with experience of out-of-home care (OHC) as a high-risk group for premature mortality. While many have argued that educational success is a key factor in reducing these individuals’ excessive death risks, the empirical evidence has hitherto been limited. The aim of the current study was therefore to examine the potentially mitigating role of educational success for the association between OHC experience and premature mortality.

Methods: Drawing on a Stockholm cohort born in 1953 (n=15,117), we analysed the associations between placement in OHC (ages 0-12), school performance (ages 13, 16, and 19), and premature all-cause mortality (ages 20-56) by means of Cox and Laplace regression analysis.

Results: The Cox regression models confirmed the increased risk of premature mortality among individuals with OHC experience. Unadjusted Laplace regression models showed that these children died more than a decade, based on median survival time, before their majority population peers. However, among individuals who performed well at school, i.e. scored above-average marks at age 16 (grade 9) and age 19 (grade 12), respectively, the risks of premature mortality did not significantly differ between the two groups.

Conclusion: Educational success seems to mitigate the increased risks of premature death among children with experience of OHC.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2018.
Keywords [en]
Cohort studies; Education, Health inequalities; Life course/childhood circumstances; Mortality
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology Social Work Sociology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-158024DOI: 10.1136/jech-2018-210487OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-158024DiVA, id: diva2:1231296
Available from: 2018-07-06 Created: 2018-07-06 Last updated: 2018-07-06

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Publisher's full texthttp://dx.doi.org/10.1136/jech-2018-210487

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B Almquist, YlvaJackisch, JosephineGauffin, KarlHjern, AndersVinnerljung, BoBrännström, Lars
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Department of Public Health SciencesDepartment of Social Work
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and EpidemiologySocial WorkSociology

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