Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
The Population Impact of Childhood Health Conditions on Dropout from Upper-Secondary Education
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Public Health Sciences. University of Helsinki, Finland; The Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Germany.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-9374-1438
Number of Authors: 42018 (English)In: Journal of Pediatric Surgery Case Reports, ISSN 0022-3476, E-ISSN 2213-5766, Vol. 196, p. 283-290.e4Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objectives To quantify how large a part of educational dropout is due to adverse childhood health conditions and to estimate the risk of dropout across various physical and mental health conditions. Study design A registry-based cohort study was conducted on a 20% random sample of Finns born in 1988-1995 (n = 101 284) followed for school dropout at ages 17 and 21. Four broad groups of health conditions (any, somatic, mental, and injury) and 25 specific health conditions were assessed from inpatient and outpatient care records at ages 10-16 years. We estimated the immediate and more persistent risks of dropout due to health conditions and calculated population-attributable fractions to quantify the population impact of childhood health on educational dropout, while accounting for a wide array of sociodemographic confounders and comorbidity. Results Children with any health condition requiring inpatient or outpatient care at ages 10-16 years were more likely to be dropouts at ages 17 years (risk ratio 1.71, 95% CI 1.61-1.81) and 21 years (1.46, 1.37-1.54) following adjustment for individual and family sociodemographic factors. A total of 30% of school dropout was attributable to health conditions at age 17 years and 21% at age 21 years. Mental disorders alone had an attributable fraction of 11% at age 21 years, compared with 5% for both somatic conditions and injuries. Adjusting for the presence of mental disorders reduced the effects of somatic conditions. Conclusions More than one fifth of educational dropout is attributable to childhood health conditions. Early-onset mental disorders emerge as key targets in reducing dropout.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2018. Vol. 196, p. 283-290.e4
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology Pediatrics
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-157808DOI: 10.1016/j.jpeds.2018.01.034ISI: 000432452300051PubMedID: 29551321OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-157808DiVA, id: diva2:1234446
Available from: 2018-07-24 Created: 2018-07-24 Last updated: 2018-07-24Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text in DiVA

Other links

Publisher's full textPubMed

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Mikkonen, JanneMoustgaard, HetaMartikainen, Pekka
By organisation
Department of Public Health Sciences
In the same journal
Journal of Pediatric Surgery Case Reports
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and EpidemiologyPediatrics

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

doi
pubmed
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
pubmed
urn-nbn
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf