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Hypothermia modulates the DNA damage response to ionizing radiation in human peripheral blood lymphocytes
Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Molecular Biosciences, The Wenner-Gren Institute.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-0984-6964
Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Molecular Biosciences, The Wenner-Gren Institute.
Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Molecular Biosciences, The Wenner-Gren Institute.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-2023-7454
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Number of Authors: 82018 (English)In: International Journal of Radiation Biology, ISSN 0955-3002, E-ISSN 1362-3095, Vol. 94, no 6, p. 551-557Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose: Low temperature at exposure has been shown to act in a radioprotective manner at the level of cytogenetic damage. It was suggested to be due to an effective transformation of DNA damage to chromosomal damage at low temperature. The purpose of the study was to analyze the kinetics of aberration formation during the first hours after exposing human peripheral blood lymphocytes to ionizing radiation at 0.8 degrees C and 37 degrees C.Materials and methods: To this end, we applied the technique of premature chromosome condensation. In addition, DNA damage response was analyzed by measuring the levels of phosphorylated DNA damage responsive proteins ATM, DNA-PK and p53 and mRNA levels of the radiation-responsive genes BBC3, FDXR, GADD45A, XPC, MDM2 and CDKN1A.Results: A consistently lower frequency of chromosomal breaks was observed in cells exposed at 0.8 degrees C as compared to 37 degrees C already after 30minutes postexposure. This effect was accompanied by elevated levels of phosphorylated ATM and DNA-PK proteins and a reduced immediate level of phosphorylated p53 and of the responsive genes.Conclusions: Low temperature at exposure appears to promote DNA repair leading to reduced transformation of DNA damage to chromosomal aberrations.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2018. Vol. 94, no 6, p. 551-557
Keywords [en]
Hypothermia, temperature, premature chromosome condensation, chromosome aberrations, DNA damage response
National Category
Biological Sciences Mechanical Engineering Clinical Medicine
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-158216DOI: 10.1080/09553002.2018.1466206ISI: 000433973000004PubMedID: 29668347OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-158216DiVA, id: diva2:1235362
Available from: 2018-07-25 Created: 2018-07-25 Last updated: 2018-07-25Bibliographically approved

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Cheng, LeiLundholm, LovisaWojcik, Andrzej
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