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Habitat Connectivity of Fish in Temperate Shallow-Water Seascapes
Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Ecology, Environment and Plant Sciences.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-4329-9052
Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Ecology, Environment and Plant Sciences.
Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Ecology, Environment and Plant Sciences.
2018 (English)In: Frontiers in Marine Science, E-ISSN 2296-7745, Vol. 4, article id 440Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Movements of organisms comprise a fundamental aspect of coastal habitat connectivity. Determining the distribution and co-existence of habitat specialists and generalists in shallow-water seascapes leads to a better understanding of the strength of connectivity-driven community patterns in coastal areas. In this study, unbaited Remote Underwater Video (RUV) systems were used to examine habitat usage and connectivity of fish within six shallow-water coastal seascapes on the Swedish west coast. Within each seascape, video sampling was conducted at three different shallow-water habitats: seagrass meadows, rock-macroalgae and unvegetated areas, in June 2014. Comparative analyses showed that the shallow-water fish community was similar in adjacent habitats within a seascape, though abundances of fish were higher within the structurally complex habitats. All habitats were dominated by juveniles, highlighting the importance of the coastal seascape for early fish life stages. The findings demonstrate that adjacent shallow-water habitats in temperate coastal waters are linked through similar species utilization and that the coastal matrix could be regarded in terms of a seascape nursery for fish. The study highlights the importance of considering shallow-water seascape connectivity in coastal conservation planning and management.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2018. Vol. 4, article id 440
Keywords [en]
fish assemblages, RUV, seascape nursery, habitat connectivity, marine coastal ecosystem
National Category
Ecology
Research subject
Marine Ecology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-158218DOI: 10.3389/fmars.2017.00440OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-158218DiVA, id: diva2:1235398
Available from: 2018-07-25 Created: 2018-07-25 Last updated: 2018-11-28Bibliographically approved
In thesis
1. Swedish seagrass ecosystems in a changing climate: Coastal connectivity and global change sensitivity
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Swedish seagrass ecosystems in a changing climate: Coastal connectivity and global change sensitivity
2018 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Coastal shallow-water ecosystems are essential for providing several goods and services globally, with seagrasses as an important contributor for maintaining high biodiversity and productivity within the nearshore seascape. The temperate species Zostera marina serves as a vital habitat for many species, including ecologically and economically important juvenile fish. Ecological patterns and processes within the shallow-water seascape are driven by a multitude of factors, for instance food-web dynamics, species interactions, habitat configuration, oceanographic hydrodynamics, and influenced by human impacts, all occurring at different spatial and temporal scales. A complex interworking of abiotic and biotic processes takes place within the coastal environment with the system expected to be impacted by future climate changes. This scientific work contributes to the ecological understanding of coastal marine ecosystems by examining connectivity and disturbance effects on multiple spatiotemporal scales. 

The thesis consists of two main themes: 1) evaluation of the influence of seascape structure on seagrass fish communities at different scales, and 2) understanding species’ physiological responses to multiple global change stressors in Z. marina meadows, and the regional implications of these results. The work focused on temperate Swedish coastal waters. To address these themes a variety of methods were performed including a seascape ecology field approach, experimental laboratory work and spatial modeling. The results contribute to the understanding of seascape connectivity and the impact of disturbance from climate-related stressors on the shallow-water ecosystem and associated fish communities. 

The results highlight the importance of evaluating fish assemblages at multiple spatial scales, from within-meadow characteristics to region-wide geographical features. Generally, fish with higher site fidelity were found to be influenced by smaller scale (meters) habitat characteristics, while broader ranging, more migratory species showed impacts on a larger scale (kilometers). It was also shown that the shallow-water environment has a fish assemblage overlap, with the same species found within multiple coastal habitats, dominated by juvenile fish (in summer), thus constituting a shallow-water seascape nursery. Regarding the consequences of global change the thesis showed that, while individual global change stressors can have either positive, negative or neutral affects depending on the species in question, all trophic levels of the mesocosm study showed a deleterious stress response to multiple stressors combined. With the significance of these laboratory results in mind, the final risk assessment identified three high-risk regions for seagrass meadows along parts of the Swedish coast that are expected to be exposed to a high degree of change from multiple coinciding global stressors by the end of the century.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Stockholm: Department of Ecology, Environment and Plant Sciences, Stockholm University, 2018
Keywords
coastal seascape, shallow-water ecosystems, fish assemblages, connectivity, global change, climate change, multiple stressors, seagrass, Zostera marina, temperate region
National Category
Ecology
Research subject
Marine Ecology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-158420 (URN)978-91-7797-375-1 (ISBN)978-91-7797-374-4 (ISBN)
Public defence
2018-09-14, Vivi Täckholmsalen (Q-salen), NPQ-huset, Svante Arrhenius väg 20, Stockholm, 10:00 (English)
Opponent
Supervisors
Note

At the time of the doctoral defense, the following papers were unpublished and had a status as follows: Paper 4: Submitted. Paper 5: Manuscript.

Available from: 2018-08-22 Created: 2018-07-31 Last updated: 2018-08-22Bibliographically approved

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