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Metabolic syndrome components: Is there a difference according to exposure to night work?
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute. University of São Paulo, Brazil.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-1839-9673
Number of Authors: 32018 (English)In: Chronobiology International, ISSN 0742-0528, E-ISSN 1525-6073, Vol. 35, no 6, p. 801-810Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The aim of this study was to compare metabolic aspects potentially associated with metabolic syndrome (MetS), in addition to serum leptin levels and sleep, according to exposure to night work among nursing staff. A cross-sectional study involving 60 nursing staff was conducted. Sociodemographic, sleep (Karolinska Sleep Questionnaire), physical activity (International Physical Activity Questionnaire), and nutrition data (16-Food Intake Questionnaire) were collected. Body measurements and blood pressure were taken and blood collected to determine glycemia, total cholesterol and portions of low-density lipoprotein and high-density lipoprotein and triglycerides, and leptin levels. The sample was divided into three groups according to exposure to night work (nonexposed, currently exposed, past exposure). Furthermore, to evaluate the relationship between exposure time and prevalence of MetS, the night-exposed groups (past and current) were divided according to time exposed to night shifts (<10 years and >= 10 years). Mean age of participants was 39.8 +/- 10.5 years. The groups were homogenous with regard to sociodemographic characteristics, physical activity, dietary patterns, and health aspects. The prevalence of MetS in the population studied was 32%, above the rate for the general population. However, there were no significant differences among the groups. In addition, a higher proportion of participants with hypertriglyceridemia and diastolic arterial hypertension was observed in the currently exposed group. The currently exposed group also reported less sleep and higher sleep debt than the other groups on workdays. Although no differences were observed among the groups regarding MetS, the currently exposed group had more sleep disturbances than the others, and a higher prevalence of two out of three risk factors for the MetS diagnosis.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2018. Vol. 35, no 6, p. 801-810
Keywords [en]
Metabolic syndrome, night work, sleep, leptin, nurses
National Category
Biological Sciences Occupational Health and Environmental Health
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-159186DOI: 10.1080/07420528.2018.1450267ISI: 000439716200009PubMedID: 29580071OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-159186DiVA, id: diva2:1240821
Available from: 2018-08-22 Created: 2018-08-22 Last updated: 2018-08-22Bibliographically approved

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