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Cognitive functioning among patients with diabetic foot
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Aging Research Center (ARC), (together with KI). Italian National Council Research (CNR), Italy.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-9672-6978
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Aging Research Center (ARC), (together with KI).
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Aging Research Center (ARC), (together with KI).ORCID iD: 0000-0001-6199-9629
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Aging Research Center (ARC), (together with KI). University of Florence, Italy.
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Number of Authors: 92014 (English)In: Journal of diabetes and its complications, ISSN 1056-8727, E-ISSN 1873-460X, Vol. 28, no 6, p. 863-868Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Aims: Using diabetic foot (OF) as an indicator of severe diabetes, we aimed to investigate the cognitive profile of OF patients and the relations between cognitive functioning and both diabetes complications and comorbidities. Methods: Dementia-free patients with DF aged 30-90 (n = 153) were assessed through medical records and a cognitive battery. Information on diabetes complications and comorbidities was collected via interview; glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) was tested. Data were analyzed using robust logistic or quantile regression adjusted for potential confounders. Results: The mean Mini-Mental Examination (MMSE) score of patients was 24.6 (SD = 3.6), and 40% had global cognitive dysfunction (MMSE <= 24). Among elderly patients (aged >= 65), MMSE impairment was related to amputation (OR 3.59, 95% CI 1.07-12.11). Episodic memory impairment was associated with foot amputation (OR 4.13, 95% CI 1.11-1528) and microvascular complications (OR 9.68, 95% CI 1.67-56.06). Further, elderly patients with HbA1c <7% had increased odds of psychomotor slowness (OR 7.75, 95% CI 1.55-38.73) and abstract reasoning impairment (OR 4.49, 95% CI: 1.15-17.46). However, such significant associations were not shown in adult patients aged <65. Conclusion: Amputation, microvascular diseases and glycemic control were associated with impaired global cognitive function and its domains among patients aged >= 65.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2014. Vol. 28, no 6, p. 863-868
Keywords [en]
Diabetes, Cognition, Diabetes complication, Diabetic foot, HbA1c
National Category
Geriatrics Endocrinology and Diabetes
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-159558DOI: 10.1016/j.jdiacomp.2014.07.005ISI: 000344981200020PubMedID: 25127250OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-159558DiVA, id: diva2:1244636
Available from: 2018-09-03 Created: 2018-09-03 Last updated: 2018-09-03Bibliographically approved

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Marseglia, AnnaRizzuto, Debora
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