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The Frankenstein's Monster Project: Learning to Understand the Monster
Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
2018 (English)Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
Abstract [en]

The present essay sets out to research what literary tools an author can use in order to create what Suzanne Keen calls narrative empathy. One of the most effective techniques used to evoke narrative empathy in a reader is to help the reader feel character identification for a character, for example by using a first-person narrative. Additionally, character identification is further strengthened by an immersive narrative situation, which can be created through using a great deal of adequate imagery. The aim of the present essay is to explore the concept of narrative empathy. In order to do so, passages from Mary Shelley’s novel Frankenstein were analyzed to investigate how these literary devices can be used. The results show that Shelley used multiple tools to successfully create an empathic character out of a character that would usually be regarded as a monster or a villain. Some of the techniques used are a first-person narrative, a great deal of imagery, and switching between quicker and slower reading paces. In addition to the literary analysis of the novel, an alternative to how the novel and narrative empathy could be taught to upper secondary school students is presented. This plan is called The Frankenstein’s Monster Project, the aim of which is to teach students narrative empathy and to raise students’ awareness regarding bullying and alienation. The thesis suggests that this could be done through a wide range of exercises, in which all four skills (speaking, listening, reading and writing) will be incorporated for an increased motivation and retention of knowledge.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2018. , p. 31
Keywords [en]
Narrative empathy, character identification, narrative situation, altruistic behavior, bullying
National Category
Languages and Literature
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-159997OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-159997DiVA, id: diva2:1247930
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Available from: 2018-09-17 Created: 2018-09-13 Last updated: 2018-09-17Bibliographically approved

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Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
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Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
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  • asciidoc
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