Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
A Review of Work-Family Research in the Nordic Region
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute.
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Work and organizational psychology.
2018 (English)In: The Cambridge Handbook of the Global Work–Family Interface / [ed] Kristen M. Shockley, Winny Shen, Ryan C. Johnson, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2018, p. 288-302Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

A fundamental issue concerning work and family is the extent that women and men work and take care of children. The Nordic countries (i.e., Sweden, Denmark, Norway, Finland, and Iceland for the purposes of this review) are characterized by a “dual-worker model” in which a majority of both women and men participate in paid work, but are also, to some extent, characterized by a “dual-carer model” in which both women and men actively take part in the upbringing of their children (Edlund & Öun, 2016). The Nordic countries have a history of family policies being directed toward both mothers and fathers, and state provisions for dual-earner family support and childcare were developed in a political context with women’s equality in mind (Ellingsaeter & Leira, 2006). Still, the challenge of combining work and family domains is under continual debate and development in the Nordic countries. In the next sections, we will briefly describe the general trends of women’s participation in the labor market in relation to the development of the welfare system. This historical development is crucial for the understanding of how women and men combine work and family in the Nordic countries today.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2018. p. 288-302
Series
Cambridge Handbooks in Psychology
Keywords [en]
work-family interface, gender, segregated labor market, health outcomes
National Category
Psychology
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-160446DOI: 10.1017/9781108235556.015ISBN: 9781108415972 (print)ISBN: 9781108401265 (print)ISBN: 9781108235556 (electronic)OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-160446DiVA, id: diva2:1250592
Available from: 2018-09-24 Created: 2018-09-24 Last updated: 2018-09-26Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text in DiVA

Other links

Publisher's full text

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Leineweber, ConstanzeFalkenberg, Helena
By organisation
Stress Research InstituteWork and organizational psychology
Psychology

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

doi
isbn
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
isbn
urn-nbn
Total: 84 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf