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Greater rewards in videogames lead to more presence, enjoyment and effort
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Number of Authors: 62018 (English)In: Computers in human behavior, ISSN 0747-5632, E-ISSN 1873-7692, Vol. 87, p. 66-74Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

There is currently limited understanding of whether and how different amounts and diversity of virtual rewards impact on the player experience. A repeated-measures experiment was undertaken in which participants (N = 59) were compared on subjective measures (competence, presence-immersion, tension, effort and enjoyment), as well as psychophysiological measures (electrodermal activity and heart-beat rate), during the play of a videogame with three levels of video game reward (high, medium, low). Effort, enjoyment and presence-immersion significantly varied across conditions such that they were greater when all rewards were present compared to one or both of the other conditions. Heart-beat rate was found to vary across conditions consistent with the explanation that greater rewards lead to greater arousal. Our study suggest a number of advantages to greater amount and diversity of virtual rewards in the context of a casual videogame, with potential application to the design of new gamification systems.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2018. Vol. 87, p. 66-74
Keywords [en]
Videogame, Reward, Psychophysiology, Player experience
National Category
Psychology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-160195DOI: 10.1016/j.chb.2018.05.025ISI: 000441485600007OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-160195DiVA, id: diva2:1251340
Available from: 2018-09-27 Created: 2018-09-27 Last updated: 2018-09-27Bibliographically approved

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Johnson, DanielVella, Kellie
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