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How is Job Insecurity Related to Self-rated and Supervisor-rated Job Performance? A Test of Cross-sectional and Longitudinal Associations
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Work and organizational psychology. University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Work and organizational psychology.
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Work and organizational psychology. North-West University, Potchefstroom, South Africa.
2018 (English)In: Book of proceedings 13th Conference of the European Academy of Occupational Health Psychology: Adapting to rapid changes in today's workplace / [ed] K. Teoh, N. Saade, V. Dediu, J. Hassard & L. Torres, Nottingham: European Academy of Occupational Health Psychology , 2018, p. 288-289, article id O110Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Purpose: While previous research has shown that job insecurity is linked to job performance, the number of studies exploring this relationship is limited and the results are mixed (Cheng & Chan, 2008; Sverke et al., 2002). This duality is also reflected in theoretical frameworks. For instance, psychological contract theory implicates that job insecurity may result in lower performance (De Cuyper & De Witte, 2006; Vander Elst et al., 2016), whereas impression management theory suggests that performance may increase as a consequence of perceived job insecurity (Huang et al., 2013). Further, the type of performance ratings used in previous studies has been discussed, and the sole use of self-ratings of performance is upheld as potentially problematic (e.g. Probst et al., 2017). In response to previous criticism of studies in this field regarding self-ratings of performance, both self- and supervisor-ratings of job performance are included in this study. Lastly, there have also been calls for more longitudinal studies in job insecurity research, addressing the question of short- and long-term effects of job insecurity (Greenhalgh & Rosenblatt, 2010). Taken together, this study seeks to address the mixed results found in previous research regarding the relationship between job insecurity and job performance. More specifically, the aim is to investigate how job insecurity is related to self- and supervisor-rated performance, both cross-sectionally and over time.

Design: The study is based on survey data collected among white-collar employees in a large industrial enterprise in Sweden. The data collection had a longitudinal design with 2 data waves. The questionnaire data will be supplemented with supervisor ratings of overall performance.

Findings: Questionnaire data from employees have been collected, and preliminary results indicate that job insecurity can result in lower job performance. Supervisor-ratings are currently being collected.

Research limitations: While the study adds to the literature by investigating both cross-sectional and longitudinal associations of job insecurity with self-rated as well as supervisor-rated job performance, it does not unravel the nature of causal associations. In addition, the results need replication in other national and occupational contexts.

Practical implications: The present study links job insecurity with lower performance. The results thus have important implications for organisations navigating high demands for flexibility and tight business margins. Organisations should make efforts to prevent job insecurity from emerging as a concern among employees in order to avoid reduced job performance.

Originality: By combining a longitudinal design with self- and supervisor-ratings of task performance, this study adds to previous research in two different ways: We investigate both (1) short- and long-terms associations between job insecurity and job performance, and (2) test these associations using both self- and supervisor-ratings of job performance.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Nottingham: European Academy of Occupational Health Psychology , 2018. p. 288-289, article id O110
Keywords [en]
job insecurity, job performance, self-ratings, supervisor ratings
National Category
Psychology
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-160551ISBN: 978-0-9928786-4-1 (print)OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-160551DiVA, id: diva2:1251720
Conference
13th European Academy of Occupational Health Psychology Conference 2018, Lisbon, Portugal, September 5-7, 2018
Available from: 2018-09-27 Created: 2018-09-27 Last updated: 2019-01-10Bibliographically approved

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