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Resource-Oriented Internet Intervention for Occupational Stress among Medical Professionals (Med-Stress): Study Protocol for a Randomized Controlled Trial
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2018 (English)Conference paper, Poster (with or without abstract) (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Medical professionals are at high risk for job stress and burnout. Research show that the negative effects of stress can be reduced through strengthening personal resources such as self-efficacy and perceived social support. In line with cultivation and enabling hypotheses (Schwarzer & Knoll, 2007; Benight & Bandura, 2004) either self-efficacy cultivates perceived support, or rather perceived support enables self-efficacy. This study aims at testing both hypotheses in experimental design by applying them as a theoretical framework for the Med-Stress: evidence-based, CBI-framed internet intervention to foster resource accumulation among medical professionals.The effectiveness of intervention will be tested in a four-arm randomized controlled trial comparing the effects of: 1) self-efficacy and perceived support sequential enhancement (cultivation hypothesis), 2) perceived support and self-efficacy sequential enhancement (enabling hypothesis), 3) only self-efficacy, and 4) only social support enhancement (controls). Primary outcomes are job stress and burnout, secondary outcomes include work engagement, depression, and secondary traumatic stress. Self-efficacy and perceived support are expected to mediate the relationships between condition assignment and outcomes. Assessments include pre-test (Tl), three or six-weeks post-tests (depending on the condition, T2), as well as six- and twelve-months follow-ups (T3, T4). A total of N = 400 participants will be recruited. We will analyze intervention effect sizes and between-groups comparisons at post-intervention and follow-ups. This study will contribute to the findings on the role of personal resources in the development of job stress and burnout by demonstrating the cultivation vs enabling effects of self-efficacy and perceived social support.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2018. article id 112
Keywords [en]
internet intervention, occupational stress, med-stress
National Category
Psychology
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-160644OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-160644DiVA, id: diva2:1252244
Conference
5th conference of the European Society for Research on Internet Interventions, Dublin, Ireland, April 19-20, 2018
Available from: 2018-10-01 Created: 2018-10-01 Last updated: 2018-10-02Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

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Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
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Output format
  • html
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  • asciidoc
  • rtf