Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Partner choice in Sweden: How distance still matters
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Human Geography. Uppsala University, Sweden.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-1246-2427
2019 (English)In: Environment and planning A, ISSN 0308-518X, E-ISSN 1472-3409, Vol. 51, no 2, p. 440-460Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Spatial homogamy, or the geographical closeness of life partners, has received little attention inrecent decades. Theoretically, partners may be found anywhere in the world, as increases ineducational participation, affluence, mobility and internet access have reduced the meaning ofgeographical distance in general. This paper examines whether geography still matters in theSwedish partner market, by examining distances between partners before co-residence overtime. Register data are used to track the residential histories (1990–2008) of couples whomarried or had a child in 1996, 2002 or 2008 (N¼292,652). With the couple as the unit ofanalysis, the distance between partners before co-residence is explained by geographical, socioeconomicand demographic indicators. I find that although the distance between partners hasincreased over time, it is still the case that half of all partners lived within 9 kilometres of eachother before moving in together. Demographic and socio-economic characteristics explain someof the variation in spatial homogamy, but geographical factors, such as previous place of residence,spatial mobility, degree of urbanization and nearness of parents, are crucial. Even in a globalizedsociety, most people still find their partners very close by. The findings are relevant to the familymigration literature, where residential mobility at the beginning of co-residence has received littleattention, despite long-lasting consequences of partner choice on social ties and people’s socioeconomiccareers. The results exemplify the importance of short geographical distances forintimate relationships.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2019. Vol. 51, no 2, p. 440-460
Keywords [en]
partner choice, marriage, co-residence, spatial homogamy, Sweden
National Category
Human Geography
Research subject
Human Geography
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-160659DOI: 10.1177/0308518X18786726ISI: 000458894300011OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-160659DiVA, id: diva2:1252350
Projects
SIMSAM
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 3340-2013-5164Available from: 2018-10-01 Created: 2018-10-01 Last updated: 2019-03-04Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text in DiVA

Other links

Publisher's full text

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Haandrikman, Karen
By organisation
Department of Human Geography
In the same journal
Environment and planning A
Human Geography

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

doi
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
urn-nbn
Total: 22 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf