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Association between amygdala neurokinin-1 receptor availability and anxiety-related personality traits
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Biological psychology. Stockholm University, Sweden.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-2516-9075
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Number of Authors: 122018 (English)In: Translational Psychiatry, ISSN 2158-3188, E-ISSN 2158-3188, Vol. 8, article id 168Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Animal studies indicate that substance P (SP) and its preferred neurokinin-1 (NK1) receptor modulate stress and anxiety-related behavior. Alterations in the SP-NK1 system have also been observed in human anxiety disorders, yet little is known about the relation between this system and individual differences in personality traits associated with anxiety propensity and approach-avoidance behavior, including trait anxiety, neuroticism, and extraversion. Exploring this relation could provide important insights into the neurobiological underpinnings of human anxiety and the etiology of anxiety disorders, as anxious traits are associated with increased susceptibility to develop psychopathological conditions. Here we examined the relationship between central NK1 receptor availability and selfrated measures of trait anxiety, neuroticism, and extraversion. The amygdala was chosen as the primary region of interest since this structure has been suggested to mediate the effect of the SP-NK1 system on anxiety. Anxious traits and NK1 receptor availability, determined with positron emission tomography and the radiotracer [C-11]GR205171, were measured in 17 healthy individuals. Voxel-wise analyses showed a significant positive correlation between bilateral amygdala NK1 receptor availability and trait anxiety, and a trend in similar direction was observed for neuroticism. Conversely, extraversion was found to be negatively associated with amygdala NK1 receptor availability. Extraversion also correlated negatively with the NK1 measure in the cuneus/precuneus and fusiform gyrus according to exploratory whole-brain analyses. In conclusion, our findings indicate that amygdala NK1 receptor availability is associated with anxiety-related personality traits in healthy subjects, consistent with a modulatory role for the SP-NK1 system in human anxiety.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2018. Vol. 8, article id 168
National Category
Psychology Psychiatry
Research subject
Psychology
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URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-160069DOI: 10.1038/s41398-018-0163-1ISI: 000443079700001PubMedID: 30154470OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-160069DiVA, id: diva2:1252382
Available from: 2018-10-01 Created: 2018-10-01 Last updated: 2019-01-21Bibliographically approved

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