Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Non-targeted analysis of unexpected food contaminants using LC-HRMS
Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Environmental Science and Analytical Chemistry.
Show others and affiliations
Number of Authors: 52018 (English)In: Analytical and Bioanalytical Chemistry, ISSN 1618-2642, E-ISSN 1618-2650, Vol. 410, no 22, p. 5593-5602Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

A non-target analysis method for unexpected contaminants in food is described. Many current methods referred to as non-target are capable of detecting hundreds or even thousands of contaminants. However, they will typically still miss all other possible contaminants. Instead, a metabolomics approach might be used to obtain true non-target analysis. In the present work, such a method was optimized for improved detection capability at low concentrations. The method was evaluated using 19 chemically diverse model compounds spiked into milk samples to mimic unknown contamination. Other milk samples were used as reference samples. All samples were analyzed with UHPLC-TOF-MS (ultra-high-performance liquid chromatography time-of-flight mass spectrometry), using reversed-phase chromatography and electrospray ionization in positive mode. Data evaluation was performed by the software TracMass 2. No target lists of specific compounds were used to search for the contaminants. Instead, the software was used to sort out all features only occurring in the spiked sample data, i.e., the workflow resembled a metabolomics approach. Procedures for chemical identification of peaks were outside the scope of the study. Method, study design, and settings in the software were optimized to minimize manual evaluation and faulty or irrelevant hits and to maximize hit rate of the spiked compounds. A practical detection limit was established at 25 mu g/kg. At this concentration, most compounds (17 out of 19) were detected as intact precursor ions, as fragments or as adducts. Only 2 irrelevant hits, probably natural compounds, were obtained. Limitations and possible practical use of the approach are discussed.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2018. Vol. 410, no 22, p. 5593-5602
Keywords [en]
Non-targeted analysis, Food contaminants, Food safety, HRMS, LC-MS, Unknown analysis
National Category
Biological Sciences Chemical Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-160045DOI: 10.1007/s00216-018-1028-4ISI: 000441281600022PubMedID: 29594430OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-160045DiVA, id: diva2:1255314
Available from: 2018-10-11 Created: 2018-10-11 Last updated: 2018-10-11Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text in DiVA

Other links

Publisher's full textPubMed

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Åberg, Magnus
By organisation
Department of Environmental Science and Analytical Chemistry
In the same journal
Analytical and Bioanalytical Chemistry
Biological SciencesChemical Sciences

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

doi
pubmed
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
pubmed
urn-nbn
Total: 25 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf