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Oniomaniacs: the popular framing of consumption as a disease
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of History.
Number of Authors: 22018 (English)In: Addiction Research and Theory, ISSN 1606-6359, E-ISSN 1476-7392, Vol. 26, no 6, p. 431-438Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The aim of this article is to examine the framing of excessive consumption as a disease-like condition in the Swedish press during the years 1992-2012. Against a theoretical background discussing medicalisation, we have analysed the characteristics of problematic consumption framed as a disease, as well as the presumed causes of and responses to this problem. Alongside and intertwined with a structural and a rationalisation perspective, we find discussions and explanations of problematic consumption as a disease all through the investigated period. Class and gender are noticeable components of the core problem description, but the reductionist assumption of addiction as a brain disease seems to point to a problem beyond historical and social context. The disease conceptualisation of problematic consumption can be seen as a compensatory perspective in an individualising and consumption affirming society. However, this perspective is ultimately decided by politics and not by research. Despite being a frequently occurring perspective on a conceptual level in Sweden, it is not a legitimate description in legislation or as a cause for public treatment interventions.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2018. Vol. 26, no 6, p. 431-438
Keywords [en]
Compulsive buying, medicalisation, Sweden, 20th century
National Category
Sociology Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-161233DOI: 10.1080/16066359.2017.1396585ISI: 000445288300001OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-161233DiVA, id: diva2:1256807
Available from: 2018-10-18 Created: 2018-10-18 Last updated: 2018-10-18Bibliographically approved

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Edman, JohanBerndt, Josefine
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