Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Soy protein supplement intake for 12 months has no effect on sexual maturation and may improve nutritional status in pre-pubertal children
Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Environmental Science and Analytical Chemistry.
Show others and affiliations
Number of Authors: 62018 (English)In: Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health, ISSN 1034-4810, E-ISSN 1440-1754, Vol. 54, no 9, p. 997-1004Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Aim: To evaluate the intake of a soy protein-based supplement (SPS) and its effects on the sexual maturation and nutritional status of prepubertal children who consumed it for a year.

Methods: Healthy children (n = 51) were recruited and randomly assigned to consume the lunch fruit juice with (n = 29) or without (n = 22) addition of 45 g of a commercial soy protein-based supplement (SPS) over 12 months. Nutritional assessment including anthropometry (bodyweight, height, triceps skinfold thickness, mid-upper arm circumference), body mass index (BMI), upper arm muscle area, arm muscle circumference, upper arm area, upper arm fat area data were derived from measures using usual procedures; age and gender-specific percentiles were used as reference. Sexual maturation was measured by Tanner stage. Isoflavones were quantified using liquid chromatography and tandem mass spectrometry.

Results: Height, BMI/age, weight/age and height/age were significantly different (P < 0.05) at 12 months between girls in the control and intervention groups. Statistically significant differences between groups by gender (P < 0.05) were found in boys in the control group for the triceps skinfold thickness and fat area. Nutritional status was adequate according to the World Health Organization parameters. On average, 0.130 mg/kg body weight/day of isoflavones were consumed by children, which did not show significant differences in their sexual maturation.

Conclusion: Consumption of SPS for 12 months did not affect sexual maturation or the onset of puberty in prepubertal boys and girls; however, it may have induced an increase in height, BMI/age, height/age and weight/age of the girls, associated with variations in fat-free mass.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2018. Vol. 54, no 9, p. 997-1004
Keywords [en]
isoflavones, nutritional status, prepubertal children, sexual maturation, soy protein isolate
National Category
Clinical Medicine
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-161131DOI: 10.1111/jpc.13934ISI: 000444374600011PubMedID: 29779250OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-161131DiVA, id: diva2:1258298
Available from: 2018-10-24 Created: 2018-10-24 Last updated: 2018-10-24Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text in DiVA

Other links

Publisher's full textPubMed

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Zurita, JavierIlag, Leopold
By organisation
Department of Environmental Science and Analytical Chemistry
In the same journal
Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health
Clinical Medicine

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

doi
pubmed
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
pubmed
urn-nbn
Total: 26 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf