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Persistent postmating, prezygotic reproductive isolation between populations
Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology. University of Sheffield, UK.
Number of Authors: 22018 (English)In: Ecology and Evolution, ISSN 2045-7758, E-ISSN 2045-7758, Vol. 8, no 17, p. 9062-9073Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Studying reproductive barriers between populations of the same species is critical to understand how speciation may proceed. Growing evidence suggests postmating, prezygotic (PMPZ) reproductive barriers play an important role in the evolution of early taxonomic divergence. However, the contribution of PMPZ isolation to speciation is typically studied between species in which barriers that maintain isolation may not be those that contributed to reduced gene flow between populations. Moreover, in internally fertilizing animals, PMPZ isolation is related to male ejaculatefemale reproductive tract incompatibilities but few studies have examined how mating history of the sexes can affect the strength of PMPZ isolation and the extent to which PMPZ isolation is repeatable or restricted to particular interacting genotypes. We addressed these outstanding questions using multiple populations of Drosophila montana. We show a recurrent pattern of PMPZ isolation, with flies from one population exhibiting reproductive incompatibility in crosses with all three other populations, while those three populations were fully fertile with each other. Reproductive incompatibility is due to lack of fertilization and is asymmetrical, affecting female fitness more than males. There was no effect of male or female mating history on reproductive incompatibility, indicating that PMPZ isolation persists between populations. We found no evidence of variability in fertilization outcomes attributable to different femalexmale genotype interactions, and in combination with our other results, suggests that PMPZ isolation is not driven by idiosyncratic genotypexgenotype interactions. Our results show PMPZ isolation as a strong, consistent barrier to gene flow early during speciation and suggest several targets of selection known to affect ejaculate-female reproductive tract interactions within species that may cause this PMPZ isolation.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2018. Vol. 8, no 17, p. 9062-9073
Keywords [en]
Drosophila montana, gametic isolation, postmating prezygotic isolation, sexual conflict, sexual selection, speciation
National Category
Biological Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-161108DOI: 10.1002/ece3.4441ISI: 000445606000034PubMedID: 30271566OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-161108DiVA, id: diva2:1259656
Available from: 2018-10-30 Created: 2018-10-30 Last updated: 2018-10-30Bibliographically approved

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