Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Resolving faint structures in the debris disk around TWA 7 Tentative detections of an outer belt, a spiral arm, and a dusty cloud
Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Astronomy. Max Planck Institut für Astronomie, Germany.
Show others and affiliations
Number of Authors: 542018 (English)In: Astronomy and Astrophysics, ISSN 0004-6361, E-ISSN 1432-0746, Vol. 617, article id A109Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Context. Debris disks are the intrinsic by-products of the star and planet formation processes. Most likely due to instrumental limitations and their natural faintness, little is known about debris disks around low mass stars, especially when it comes to spatially resolved observations. Aims. We present new VLT/SPHERE IRDIS dual-polarization imaging (DPI) observations in which we detect the dust ring around the M2 spectral type star TWA 7. Combined with additional angular differential imaging observations we aim at a fine characterization of the debris disk and setting constraints on the presence of low-mass planets. Methods. We modeled the SPHERE DPI observations and constrain the location of the small dust grains, as well as the spectral energy distribution of the debris disk, using the results inferred from the observations, and performed simple N-body simulations. Results. We find that the dust density distribution peaks at similar to 0.72 '' (25 au), with a very shallow outer power-law slope, and that the disk has an inclination of similar to 13 degrees with a position angle of similar to 91 degrees east of north. We also report low signal-to-noise ratio detections of an outer belt at a distance of similar to 1.5 '' (similar to 52 au) from the star, of a spiral arm in the southern side of the star, and of a possible dusty clump at 0.11 ''. These findings seem to persist over timescales of at least a year. Using the intensity images, we do not detect any planets in the close vicinity of the star, but the sensitivity reaches Jovian planet mass upper limits. We find that the SED is best reproduced with an inner disk at similar to 0.2 '' (similar to 7 au) and another belt at 0.72 '' (25 au). Conclusions. We report the detections of several unexpected features in the disk around TWA 7. A yet undetected 100 M-circle plus planet with a semi-major axis at 20-30 au could possibly explain the outer belt as well as the spiral arm. We conclude that stellar winds are unlikely to be responsible for the spiral arm.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2018. Vol. 617, article id A109
Keywords [en]
circumstellar matter, instrumentation: high angular resolution, instrumentation: polarimeters
National Category
Astronomy, Astrophysics and Cosmology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-161190DOI: 10.1051/0004-6361/201832583ISI: 000445592400001OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-161190DiVA, id: diva2:1260379
Available from: 2018-11-02 Created: 2018-11-02 Last updated: 2018-11-02Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text in DiVA

Other links

Publisher's full text

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Janson, MarkusCaceres, C.Asensio-Torres, Ruben
By organisation
Department of Astronomy
In the same journal
Astronomy and Astrophysics
Astronomy, Astrophysics and Cosmology

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

doi
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
urn-nbn
Total: 8 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf