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Knowing (or Not) about Katyń: The Silencing and Surfacing of Public Memory
University of New South Wales.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-6802-0540
2012 (English)In: Space & Polity, ISSN 1356-2576, E-ISSN 1470-1235, Vol. 16, no 3, p. 303-319Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Abstract For Poles, the Katy? Forest, in Russia, is a place immediately associated with national suffering. Katy? is one of three sites where approximately 20 000 Poles were executed during World War II, by the Soviet secret service. To shore up wartime political dependencies, knowledge of Katy? was silenced by the dominant hegemony. The public absence of Katy? narratives compelled their safeguarding and presence (where possible) in private spheres of the home. In 2010, the death of 96 people at Katy??en route to commemorate the massacre?etched a new scar on an existing wound. The shifting of Katy? narratives between public absence and private presence exemplifies the importance of power in silencing public memory narratives. For Poles, the Katy? Forest, in Russia, is a place immediately associated with national suffering. Katy? is one of three sites where approximately 20 000 Poles were executed during World War II, by the Soviet secret service. To shore up wartime political dependencies, knowledge of Katy? was silenced by the dominant hegemony. The public absence of Katy? narratives compelled their safeguarding and presence (where possible) in private spheres of the home. In 2010, the death of 96 people at Katy??en route to commemorate the massacre?etched a new scar on an existing wound. The shifting of Katy? narratives between public absence and private presence exemplifies the importance of power in silencing public memory narratives.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Routledge , 2012. Vol. 16, no 3, p. 303-319
National Category
Human Geography
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-161636DOI: 10.1080/13562576.2012.733570OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-161636DiVA, id: diva2:1260409
Available from: 2018-11-02 Created: 2018-11-02 Last updated: 2018-11-02

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