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Frailty predicts short-term survival even in older adults without multimorbidity
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Aging Research Center (ARC), (together with KI). University of Brescia, Italy.
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Aging Research Center (ARC), (together with KI). Catholic University of Rome, Italy.
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Aging Research Center (ARC), (together with KI). University of Brescia, Italy.
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Aging Research Center (ARC), (together with KI).
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Number of Authors: 82018 (English)In: European journal of internal medicine, ISSN 0953-6205, E-ISSN 1879-0828, Vol. 56, p. 53-56Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background

Frailty and multimorbidity are both strongly associated with poor health-related outcomes, including mortality. Being multimorbidity one of the major determinants of frailty, we aimed to explore whether, and to what extent, frailty without multimorbidity plays an independent role in shortening life.

Methods

We used data from the Swedish National Study on Aging and Care in Kungsholmen (SNAC-K). Among the 3363 adults aged 60+ enrolled at baseline, those without multimorbidity (i.e.: less than two chronic diseases) (N = 1115) have been characterized according to Fried's frailty phenotype (i.e. robust, prefrail, and frail). The association between frailty and mortality was estimated using piecewise proportional hazard regression models in three five-year time periods.

Results

Among participants without multimorbidity, 424 (38%) were prefrail and 19 (2%) were frail. During the 15-year follow-up, 263 (24%) participants died: 19%, 29%, and 63% of those who were robust, prefrail, and frail at baseline, respectively. Within the first 5 years of follow-up, prefrail and frail participants had more than doubled mortality risk in comparison to robust ones (HR for pre-frailty 2.08, 95% CI 1.15-3.76; HR for frailty 2.69, 95% CI 1.22-5.97). Beyond 5 years, a trend of increased mortality rate was still detectable for prefrail and frail subjects in comparison to robust ones.

Conclusions

Physical frailty and pre-frailty are associated with short-term mortality in a cohort of older adults free from multimorbidity. Frailty could be a clinical indicator of increased risk of negative health outcomes even among subjects without multiple chronic conditions.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2018. Vol. 56, p. 53-56
Keywords [en]
Frailty, Mortality, Multimorbidity
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology General Practice
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-162030DOI: 10.1016/j.ejim.2018.06.012ISI: 000446216600009PubMedID: 29950278OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-162030DiVA, id: diva2:1263178
Available from: 2018-11-14 Created: 2018-11-14 Last updated: 2018-11-14Bibliographically approved

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European journal of internal medicine
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and EpidemiologyGeneral Practice

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