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Time Evolution of the Cloud Response to Moisture Intrusions into the Arctic during Winter
Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Meteorology .
Number of Authors: 42018 (English)In: Journal of Climate, ISSN 0894-8755, E-ISSN 1520-0442, Vol. 31, no 22, p. 9389-9405Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Northward fluxes of moisture and sensible heat into the Arctic affect the atmospheric stability, sea ice and snow cover, clouds, and surface energy budget. Intense moisture fluxes into the Arctic are called moisture intrusions; some can lead to basinwide increases in downward longwave radiation (DLR) at the surface, called downward infrared (IR) events. Using the ERA-Interim reanalysis from 1990 to 2016, this study investigated the time evolution of cloud amount and cloud properties and their impact on the surface radiation fluxes in response to Arctic moisture intrusions and downward IR events during winter for better understanding of the Arctic moisture intrusions. A composite analysis revealed several key features: moisture intrusions produce more clouds and higher cloud liquid and ice water content; positive cloud amount anomalies can persist for over 10 days over the Arctic Ocean during downward IR events; positive high-level and middle-level cloud anomalies are evident in the early stage, and positive low-level cloud anomalies are evident in the late stage. Greater clear-sky DLR and longwave cloud radiative forcing (CRF) over the Arctic Ocean accompany the greater all-sky DLR during the downward IR events. Greater clear-sky DLR can be attributed to higher air temperatures and higher total column water vapor, while greater longwave CRF is the result of larger cloud amount and cloud water content. Longwave CRF anomalies account for approximately 40% of the all-sky DLR anomalies.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2018. Vol. 31, no 22, p. 9389-9405
Keywords [en]
Arctic, Atmospheric circulation, Cloud cover, Cloud forcing, Clouds, Air-sea interaction
National Category
Earth and Related Environmental Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-162889DOI: 10.1175/JCLI-D-17-0896.1ISI: 000449043900001OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-162889DiVA, id: diva2:1273486
Available from: 2018-12-21 Created: 2018-12-21 Last updated: 2018-12-21Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
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Citation style
  • apa
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