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Increasing income-based inequality in suicide mortality among working-age women and men, Sweden, 1990-2007: is there a point of trend change?
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Public Health Sciences. Örebro University, Sweden.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-2088-0530
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Public Health Sciences.
Number of Authors: 32018 (English)In: Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health, ISSN 0143-005X, E-ISSN 1470-2738, Vol. 72, no 11, p. 1009-1015Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background Income inequalities have risen from the 1990s to 2000s, following the economic recession in 1994, but little research has investigated socioeconomic inequalities in suicide mortality for working-age men and women (aged between 30 and 64 years) over the time using longitudinal data in Sweden. Methods Using Swedish national register data between 1990 and 2007 as a series of repeated cohort studies with a 3-year follow-up (sample sizes were approximately 3.7 to 4.0million in each year), relative and slope indices of inequality (RII and SII respectively) based on quintiles of individual disposable income were calculated and tested for temporal trends. Results SII for the risk of suicide mortality ranged from 27.6 (95% CI 19.5 to 35.8) to 44.5 (36.3 to 52.6) in men and 5.2 (0.2 to 10.4) to 16.6 (10.7 to 22.4) in women (per 100000 population). In men, temporal trends in suicide inequalities were stable in SII but increasing in RII by 3% each year (p=0.002). In women, inequalities tended to increase in both RII and SII, especially after the late-1990s, with 10% increment in RII per year (p<0.001). Conclusions Despite universal social security and generous welfare provision, income inequalities in suicide were considerable and have widened, especially in women. The steeper rise in women may be partially related to higher job insecurity and poorer working conditions in the female dominated public sector after the recession. To reduce health consequences following an economic crisis and widened income inequalities, additional measures may be necessary in proportion to the levels of financial vulnerability.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2018. Vol. 72, no 11, p. 1009-1015
Keywords [en]
suicide, socio-economic, health inequalities, cohort studies
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-162884DOI: 10.1136/jech-2018-210696ISI: 000450417500008PubMedID: 30021795OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-162884DiVA, id: diva2:1273689
Available from: 2018-12-21 Created: 2018-12-21 Last updated: 2019-01-18Bibliographically approved

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