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Fathers' Alcohol Consumption and Long-Term Risk for Mortality in Offspring
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Public Health Sciences. Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Public Health Sciences. Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
Number of Authors: 42018 (English)In: Alcohol and Alcoholism, ISSN 0735-0414, E-ISSN 1464-3502, Vol. 53, no 6, p. 753-759Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Aim: This study examined associations between fathers' alcohol consumption and risk for total and cause-specific mortality in offspring. Short summary: We examined the associations between fathers' alcohol consumption and total and cause-specific mortality in adult offspring. Fathers' alcohol consumption was associated with increased risk of alcohol-related mortality in offspring. The association appeared to be weaker for causes of death in which alcohol plays a smaller, or less direct, role. Methods: Data on fathers' alcohol consumption, and offspring's risky use of alcohol, smoking, mental health and contact with police/childcare authorities were collected among 46,284 men (sons) aged 18-20 years, during conscription for compulsory military training in 1969/70. Data on offspring mortality were obtained from the National Cause of Death register, 1971-2008. The mortality outcomes included total mortality, alcohol-related causes of death and violent causes of death (categorized into suicides vs violent/external causes excluding suicides). Results: Compared to sons whose fathers never used alcohol, the risk for total and alcohol-related mortality among sons increased with the father's consumption level. The risk of violent death was significantly elevated among sons whose fathers drank alcohol occasionally or often, but the risk of suicide increased in the highest consumption category only. After adjustment for covariates, the results remained for alcohol-related mortality whereas they were significantly attenuated, or disappeared, for total mortality, violent death and suicide. Conclusions: Fathers' alcohol consumption is associated with increased risk of alcohol-related mortality in the offspring. Alcohol use among fathers also increases the offspring's risk of later total mortality, suicide and violent death, but these associations appear to be mediated or confounded by factors related to parental drinking and/or adverse childhood psychosocial circumstances.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2018. Vol. 53, no 6, p. 753-759
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-162756DOI: 10.1093/alcalc/agy058ISI: 000450032600017PubMedID: 30137197OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-162756DiVA, id: diva2:1274856
Available from: 2019-01-03 Created: 2019-01-03 Last updated: 2019-01-03Bibliographically approved

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