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Cascade and no-repetition rules are comparable controls for the auditory frequency mismatch negativity in oddball tasks
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Perception and psychophysics.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-4531-4313
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Perception and psychophysics.
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Perception and psychophysics.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-9924-5486
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Perception and psychophysics.
Number of Authors: 42019 (English)In: Psychophysiology, ISSN 0048-5772, E-ISSN 1469-8986, Vol. 56, no 1, article id e13280Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The mismatch negativity (MMN) has been widely studied with oddball tasks to index processing of unexpected auditory change. The MMN is computed as the difference of deviant minus standard and is used to capture the pattern violation by the deviant. However, this oddball MMN is confounded because the deviant differs physically from the standard and is presented less often. To improve measurement, the same tone as the deviant is presented in a separate condition. This control tone is equiprobable with other tones and is used to compute a corrected MMN (deviant minus control). Typically, the tones are in random order except that consecutive tones are not identical (no-repetition rule). In contrast, a recent study on frequency MMN presented tones in a regular up-and-down sequence (cascade rule). If the cascade rule is detected more easily than the no-repetition rule, there should be a lower risk of a confounding MMN within the cascade condition. However, in previous research, the cascade and no-repetition conditions differed not only in the regularity of the tone sequence but also in number of tones, frequency range, and proportion of tones. We controlled for these differences to isolate effects of regularity in the tone sequence. Results of our preregistered analyses provided moderate evidence (BF01>6) that the corrected MMN did not differ between cascade and no-repetition conditions. These findings imply that no-repetition and cascade rules are processed similarly and that the no-repetition condition provides an adequate control in frequency MMN.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2019. Vol. 56, no 1, article id e13280
Keywords [en]
cascade, mismatch negativity, N1, neural adaptation, no-repetition, oddball
National Category
Psychology Neurosciences
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-163511DOI: 10.1111/psyp.13280ISI: 000453565300009PubMedID: 30246255OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-163511DiVA, id: diva2:1275609
Available from: 2019-01-07 Created: 2019-01-07 Last updated: 2020-01-22Bibliographically approved

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