Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Prediabetes and diabetes accelerate cognitive decline and predict microvascular lesions: A population-based cohort study
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Aging Research Center (ARC), (together with KI).
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Aging Research Center (ARC), (together with KI). Stockholm Gerontology Research Center, Sweden.
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Aging Research Center (ARC), (together with KI).
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Aging Research Center (ARC), (together with KI).
Show others and affiliations
Number of Authors: 62019 (English)In: Alzheimer's & Dementia, ISSN 1552-5260, E-ISSN 1552-5279, Vol. 15, no 1, p. 25-33Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Introduction: The impact of prediabetes and diabetes on cognitive decline and the potential underlying mechanisms remain unclear. We investigated whether prediabetes and diabetes accelerate cognitive decline and brain aging, and the initial pathological changes linked to microvascular processes.

Methods: Nine-year longitudinal data from the Swedish National Study on Aging and Care-Kungsholmen (n = 2746, age >= 60 years) and the magnetic resonance imaging subsample (n = 455) were used. Cognitive function was assessed with Mini-Mental State Examination. Brain magnetic resonance imaging markers included total brain tissue, white matter, gray matter, white matter hyperintensities, and hippocampal volumes.

Results: Compared with diabetes-free status, prediabetes and diabetes were independently associated with accelerated cognitive decline. Prediabetes was cross-sectionally associated with smaller total brain tissue volume (P < .01), particularly smaller white matter volume. Diabetes was associated with larger white matter hyperintensities volume. Longitudinally, diabetes was associated with faster white matter hyperintensities accumulation. No associations between prediabetes or diabetes and hippocampal volume were found.

Discussion: Diabetes and prediabetes accelerate cognitive decline and might predict microvascular lesions among dementia-free older adults.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2019. Vol. 15, no 1, p. 25-33
Keywords [en]
Type 2 diabetes, Prediabetes, Cognitive decline, Cerebral microvascular lesions, Magnetic resonance imaging, White matter hyperintensities, Longitudinal study, Aging
National Category
Geriatrics Endocrinology and Diabetes
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-165705DOI: 10.1016/j.jalz.2018.06.3060ISI: 000455493000004PubMedID: 30114414OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-165705DiVA, id: diva2:1285573
Available from: 2019-02-04 Created: 2019-02-04 Last updated: 2019-02-04Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text in DiVA

Other links

Publisher's full textPubMed
By organisation
Aging Research Center (ARC), (together with KI)
In the same journal
Alzheimer's & Dementia
GeriatricsEndocrinology and Diabetes

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

doi
pubmed
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
pubmed
urn-nbn
Total: 36 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf