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Late-time observations of the extraordinary Type II supernova iPTF14hls
Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Astronomy. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Astronomy. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).ORCID iD: 0000-0002-2387-6801
Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Astronomy. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC). California Institute of Technology, USA.
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Number of Authors: 252019 (English)In: Astronomy and Astrophysics, ISSN 0004-6361, E-ISSN 1432-0746, Vol. 621, article id A30Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Aims. We study iPTF14hls, a luminous and extraordinary long-lived Type II supernova, which lately has attracted much attention and disparate interpretation.

Methods. We have presented new optical photometry that extends the light curves up to more than three years past discovery. We also obtained optical spectroscopy over this period, and furthermore present additional space-based observations using Swift and HST.

Results. After an almost constant luminosity for hundreds of days, the later light curve of iPTF14hls finally fades and then displays a dramatic drop after about 1000 d, but the supernova is still visible at the latest epochs presented. The spectra have finally turned nebular, and our very last optical spectrum likely displays signatures from the deep and dense interior of the explosion. A high-resolution HST image highlights the complex environment of the explosion in this low-luminosity galaxy.

Conclusions. We provide a large number of additional late-time observations of iPTF14hls, which are (and will continue to be) used to assess the many different interpretations for this intriguing object. In particular, the very late (+1000 d) steep decline of the optical light curve is difficult to reconcile with the proposed central engine models. The lack of very strong X-ray emission, and the emergence of intermediate-width emission lines including [S II] that we propose originate from dense, processed material in the core of the supernova ejecta, are also key observational tests for both existing and future models.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2019. Vol. 621, article id A30
Keywords [en]
supernovae: general, supernovae: individual: iPTF14hls
National Category
Physical Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-165690DOI: 10.1051/0004-6361/201833689ISI: 000454875500004OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-165690DiVA, id: diva2:1285955
Available from: 2019-02-05 Created: 2019-02-05 Last updated: 2019-12-04Bibliographically approved

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Sollerman, JesperTaddia, FrancescoFremling, ChristofferFransson, ClaesBarbarino, CristinaLunnan, RagnhildTartaglia, Leonardo
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