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Migrant labor market integration: the association between initial settlement and subsequent employment and income among migrants
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Human Geography.
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Human Geography.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-1246-2427
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Human Geography.
2019 (English)In: Geografiska Annaler. Series B, Human Geography, ISSN 0435-3684, E-ISSN 1468-0467, Vol. 101, no 2, p. 118-137Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The neighborhood effects literature indicates that a person’s place of residence may affect their socio-economic situation. This study examines the association between initial settlement and immigrants’ employment and income. Previous studies mostly used administratively defined geographical units of study, which may have led to an underestimation of neighborhood effects. The current study uses individualized neighborhoods, where neighborhoods are constructed based on each individual’s closest neighbors using geocoded register data, on different scales. In this way, more of the individual’s actual neighborhood is captured. The longitudinal study follows three cohorts of migrants and examines the relationship between the initial neighborhoods that migrants settle in and their employment and income, in the short and medium-long term. The results show clear associations between neighborhoods of initial settlement and labor market integration. Starting off in neighborhoods with high levels of deprivation is associated with lower levels of employment, while settling in affluent neighborhoods is associated with higher incomes. Findings are stable for different migrant cohorts and in the short and long term. Neighborhood effects are substantial especially for those settling in the most deprived or the most affluent neighborhoods.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2019. Vol. 101, no 2, p. 118-137
Keywords [en]
neighborhood effects, individualized neighborhoods, labor market integration, migrants
National Category
Human Geography
Research subject
Human Geography
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-166068DOI: 10.1080/04353684.2019.1581987ISI: 000467974200004OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-166068DiVA, id: diva2:1288355
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 340-2013-5164Swedish Research Council Formas, 2014-1676Available from: 2019-02-13 Created: 2019-02-13 Last updated: 2019-06-24Bibliographically approved

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Wimark, ThomasHaandrikman, KarenNielsen, Michael Meinild
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  • apa
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