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Monitoring the effects of knowledge communication on conservation managers' perception of genetic biodiversity - A case study from the Baltic Sea
Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-9286-3361
Number of Authors: 42019 (English)In: Marine Policy, ISSN 0308-597X, E-ISSN 1872-9460, Vol. 99, p. 223-229Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Despite the attention given to genetic biodiversity in international agreements such as the Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD) Strategic Plan and the Aichi Targets, previous research points at a conservation genetics gap, indicating that scientific insights into genetic biodiversity are poorly integrated into practical management. Both researchers and managers call for platforms for knowledge exchange between science and practice. However, few scientific studies on the potential effects of such knowledge transfer have been conducted. The present study is a follow-up to Lundmark et al. (2017), which identified significant effects of two forms of knowledge communication on conservation managers' concerns and beliefs in regard to Baltic Sea genetic biodiversity. This study departs from Landmark et al. (2017) and explores (a) whether the identified alterations in knowledge and beliefs persist over time, and (b) whether potential stability differs between different types of policy beliefs as well as between two types of knowledge communication (lecture and group deliberation). The results of this follow-up study show that the positive impacts on managers' self-assessed knowledge remained, while the effects on policy beliefs largely had vanished a few months after the knowledge communication. Thus, changes in beliefs seem perishable, suggesting that continuity is more important than the form of educational efforts.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2019. Vol. 99, p. 223-229
Keywords [en]
Adaptive management, Marine management, Protected areas, Knowledge communication, Deliberation, Conservation genetics
National Category
Other Social Sciences Biological Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-165798DOI: 10.1016/j.marpol.2018.10.023ISI: 000454467200028OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-165798DiVA, id: diva2:1288680
Available from: 2019-02-14 Created: 2019-02-14 Last updated: 2019-02-14Bibliographically approved

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