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Local adaptation of photoperiodic plasticity maintains life cycle variation within latitudes in a butterfly
Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology.
Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology.
Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology.
Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology.
Number of Authors: 42019 (English)In: Ecology, ISSN 0012-9658, E-ISSN 1939-9170, Vol. 100, no 1, article id e02550Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The seasonal cycle varies geographically and organisms are under selection to express life cycles that optimally exploit their spatiotemporal habitats. In insects, this often means producing an annual number of generations (voltinism) appropriate to the local season length. Variation in voltinism may arise from variation in environmental factors (e.g., temperature or photoperiod) acting on a single reaction norm shared across populations, but it may also result from local adaptation of reaction norms. However, such local adaptation is poorly explored at short geographic distances, especially within latitudes. Using a combination of common-garden rearing and life cycle modeling, we have investigated the causal factors behind voltinism variation in Swedish populations of the butterfly Pararge aegeria, focusing on a set of populations that lie within a single degree of latitude but nonetheless differ in season length and voltinism. Despite considerable differences in ambient temperature between populations, modeling suggested that the key determinant of local voltinism was in fact interpopulation differences in photoperiodic response. These include differences in the induction thresholds for winter diapause, as well as differences in photoperiodic regulation of larval development, a widespread but poorly studied phenomenon. Our results demonstrate previously neglected ways that photoperiodism may mediate insect phenological responses to temperature, and emphasize the importance of local adaptation in shaping phenological patterns in general, as well as for predicting the responses of populations to changes in climate.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2019. Vol. 100, no 1, article id e02550
Keywords [en]
insects, Lepidoptera, life history, local adaptation, phenology, photoperiodism, plasticity, voltinism
National Category
Biological Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-165790DOI: 10.1002/ecy.2550ISI: 000454706400021PubMedID: 30375642OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-165790DiVA, id: diva2:1289803
Available from: 2019-02-19 Created: 2019-02-19 Last updated: 2019-02-19Bibliographically approved

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Lindestad, OlleWheat, Christopher W.Nylin, SörenGotthard, Karl
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