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New Cities and the Emergence of 'Privatized Urbanism' in Ghana
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Human Geography.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-7679-7851
2019 (English)In: Built Environment, ISSN 0263-7960, Vol. 44, no 4, p. 438-460Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

New cities are increasingly presented as a solution to contemporary challenges of rapidly urbanizing African cities. A growing body of research has, however, questioned the appropriateness of these megaprojects on the basis of their governance structures, underlying planning principles and target groups. Yet little is known about the local constellations of government that enable and/or hinder these megaprojects to materialize. Drawing on the notion of governmentality, this paper seeks to deepen our knowledge about how particular new cities in Africa are governed and the rationalities behind them. Through an in-depth case study of Appolonia City - a new private satellite city under construction outside Accra, Ghana - the paper demonstrates how this example of privatized urbanism has reached its recent stage of implementation through a speci fic constellation of government that includes state actors at all levels, traditional authorities and private developers. The engagement of these actors is based upon multiple rationalities, including an advanced liberal rationality that emphasizes the superiority of private-led urban development; spatial rationalities that seek to form 'world-class' environments and subjects through a strong emphasis on urban formality and ordered aesthetics; prospects of economic profit-making; and assumptions on how the 'mixed city' model can provide sustainable and inclusive urban milieus. These rationalities partly conflict and Appolonia risks becoming yet another elitist urban megaproject despite its stated aim of creating a sustainable and inclusive urban environment. There is thus an urgent need to (re-)politicize the urban question in Africa in order to enable future city developments that benefit the many and not the few.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2019. Vol. 44, no 4, p. 438-460
Keywords [en]
new cities, mega-projects, rationalities, privatized urbanism, Ghana
National Category
Human Geography
Research subject
Human Geography
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-166402DOI: 10.2148/benv.44.4.438OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-166402DiVA, id: diva2:1292068
Available from: 2019-02-27 Created: 2019-02-27 Last updated: 2019-02-27Bibliographically approved

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