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Towards Functional Green Infrastructure in the Baltic Sea Region: Knowledge Production and Learning Across Borders
Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physical Geography and Quaternary Geology.
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2018 (English)In: Ecosystem Services from Forest Landscapes: Broadscale Considerations / [ed] Ajith H. Perera, Urmas Peterson, Guillermo Martínez Pastur, Louis R. Iverson, Cham: Springer, 2018, p. 57-87Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Natural capital is the foundation for delivering multiple ecosystem services important for biodiversity and human wellbeing. Functional green infrastructure (GI) is one of the land management approaches to secure the sustainable use of natural capital. This chapter presents the outcomes of a integrative research for knowledge production and learning towards functional GI in the Baltic Sea Region. The overview of attempts to develop functional GI in Sweden, Latvia, Belarus and the Russian Federation, the countries with different contexts, illustrates similar sets of challenges in the maintenance of GI functions for both biodiversity and human wellbeing. The main challenges are (1) sustaining sufficient amounts of representative ecosystems with functional connectivity, (2) maintaining land management practices that support natural and seminatural areas important for human wellbeing and (3) development of stakeholder cross-sectoral collaboration laboratories towards a sustainable use of ecosystem services across the Baltic Sea Region. To deal with these challenges, there are at least five main sets of opportunities: (1) favourable international policies towards functional GI, (2) the abundance of applied knowledge in biodiversity conservation needed for GI’s integrated spatial planning, (3) existing landscape approach initiatives with rich experience in sustainable management and governance of landscapes, (4) the potential of landscape restoration projects and (5) transdisciplinary research projects that have been practised in the Baltic Sea Region. Stakeholders have much to gain from increased multilateral, learning-based collaborations regarding all aspects of sustainable forest landscapes. Such collaborations could serve as laboratories for cross-border governance and management in the Baltic Sea Region.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Cham: Springer, 2018. p. 57-87
Keywords [en]
Biodiversity, Human wellbeing, Collaborative learning, Partnership, Integrative research, Environmental management
National Category
Environmental Sciences Physical Geography
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-167030DOI: 10.1007/978-3-319-74515-2_4ISBN: 978-3-319-74514-5 (print)ISBN: 978-3-319-74515-2 (electronic)OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-167030DiVA, id: diva2:1295964
Funder
Swedish Institute, 10976/2013Swedish Research Council Formas, 2011-1737Available from: 2019-03-13 Created: 2019-03-13 Last updated: 2019-03-13Bibliographically approved

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