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Working Life Psychosocial Conditions in Relation to Late-Life Cognitive Decline: A Population-Based Cohort Study
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Aging Research Center (ARC), (together with KI).
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Aging Research Center (ARC), (together with KI).
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Aging Research Center (ARC), (together with KI).
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Aging Research Center (ARC), (together with KI).
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Number of Authors: 62019 (English)In: Journal of Alzheimer's Disease, ISSN 1387-2877, E-ISSN 1875-8908, Vol. 67, no 1, p. 315-325Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

While the importance of working conditions on cognitive function has been tentatively suggested previously, few studies have considered cumulative effects of exposure throughout the working life. We examined the association between job demand-control status and late-life cognitive decline, taking into account exposure durations. In the population-based cohort study, Swedish National Study on Aging and Care-Kungsholmen, 2,873 dementia-free participants aged 60+ were followed up to nine years. Cognitive function was measured using the Mini-Mental State Examination. The entire working life was outlined through interview and occupations were graded with a psychosocial job-exposure matrix. Multivariate linear mixed-effects models were used. Slower cognitive decline was observed among people with high job control (beta: 0.10, 95% CI: 0.03, 0.19) and demands (beta: 0.15, 95% CI: 0.07, 0.22) in the longest-held job. Compared to active job, faster decline was shown in low strain (beta: -0.17, 95% CI: -0.26, -0.08), high strain (beta: -0.13, 95% CI: -0.24, -0.03), and passive job (beta: -0.22, 95% CI: -0.34, -0.11). Longer duration of active jobs was associated with slower cognitive decline (beta: 0.24, 95% CI: 0.16, 0.32), whereas faster decline was associated with longer durations of low strain (beta: -0.12, 95% CI: -0.19, -0.05), high strain (beta: -0.13, 95% CI: -0.21, -0.04), and passive jobs (beta: -0.12, 95% CI: -0.20, -0.04). In conclusion, not only psychologically stressful jobs, but also low-stimulating and passive jobs are associated with faster cognitive decline in later life. Duration of exposure may play a role in the psychosocial working condition-cognitive decline association.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2019. Vol. 67, no 1, p. 315-325
Keywords [en]
Cognition, cohort studies, epidemiology, psychosocial work condition, working life
National Category
Gerontology, specialising in Medical and Health Sciences Occupational Health and Environmental Health
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-166614DOI: 10.3233/JAD-180870ISI: 000457778000026PubMedID: 30530976OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-166614DiVA, id: diva2:1298639
Available from: 2019-03-25 Created: 2019-03-25 Last updated: 2019-03-25Bibliographically approved

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Wang, Hui-Xin
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Aging Research Center (ARC), (together with KI)Stress Research Institute
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