Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Recent climate-induced shape changes of the ice summit of Kebnekaise, Northern Sweden
Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physical Geography.
Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physical Geography.
Number of Authors: 22019 (English)In: Geografiska Annaler. Series A, Physical Geography, ISSN 0435-3676, E-ISSN 1468-0459, Vol. 101, no 1, p. 68-78Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The ice summit of Kebnekaise is slowly melting down as a consequence of climate change. In August 2018 this peak, which for a long time has been the highest in Sweden, reached an elevation a few decimetres lower than the nearby situated northern summit in solid rock. It has become a symbol of the fragility of nature. Its areal extent and shape have varied over time and its height has ranged within approximately 15 m during the twentieth century. Since the turn of the century, the ice summit has decreased to a new lower and smaller level but the changes are not uniform, and they show a complex relation between weather parameters and the shape and size of the summit. Layers in the ice include climate information of past changes. But what changes are we able to determine by examining gradually exposed dust layers, or by coring the summit. In this paper, we are analysing the late changes in shape and volume of the ice summit and we place the results into a paleo climate discussion. We have used photogrammetric methods to map the geometry of the summit at different dates when data has been available. We have also done a multiple regression to analyse the relation between the summit elevation and the net mass balance of the nearby located Storglaciaren. The correlation is good from mid 1970s until now but weak prior to that. It is herein explained by former uncertainties of the geographic position of the summit.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2019. Vol. 101, no 1, p. 68-78
Keywords [en]
Structure-from-motion, glacier mass balance, climate archive
National Category
Earth and Related Environmental Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-166600DOI: 10.1080/04353676.2018.1542130ISI: 000457418400005OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-166600DiVA, id: diva2:1300698
Available from: 2019-03-29 Created: 2019-03-29 Last updated: 2019-03-29Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text in DiVA

Other links

Publisher's full text

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Holmlund, Per
By organisation
Department of Physical Geography
In the same journal
Geografiska Annaler. Series A, Physical Geography
Earth and Related Environmental Sciences

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

doi
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
urn-nbn
Total: 5 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf