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Work-related psychosocial risk factors and risk of disability pension among employees in health and personal care: A prospective cohort study
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute.
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Work and organizational psychology.
2019 (English)In: International Journal of Nursing Studies, ISSN 0020-7489, E-ISSN 1873-491X, Vol. 93, p. 12-20Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Researchers have suggested that psychological factors at work contribute to early retirement due to disability pension in the general working population. Disability pension is a problem that shortens working careers among nursing professionals and personal care or related workers, but few researchers have focused on these occupational groups. Also, a need for studies based on measurements of specific work exposure instead of combined measures has been identified.

Objectives: The aim was to study the potential influence of work-related psychosocial risk factors on the future risk of disability pension among nursing professionals and care assistants in Sweden. Those occupational groups are compared to all other occupations in Sweden. A specific aim was to describe differences in associations to cause-specific disability, and how the results were modified by occupation categories.

Participants: A representative sample of 79,004 women and men in Sweden comprising 2,576 nursing professionals, 10,175 care assistants and 66,253 workers in other occupations.

Methods: Factors of the psychosocial work environment were obtained from questionnaire data of the Swedish Work Environment Surveys (SWES) 1993–2013. Information on cause-specific disability pension during follow-up was added from the Social Insurance Agency’s database (1994–2014). We calculated Cox’s proportional hazards with 95% confidence intervals.

Results: During a mean follow-up time of 11.1 years, 6.6% of nursing professionals and 9.4% of care assistants, as compared to 6.1% among all other occupations, received disability pension. Among nursing professionals and care assistants, high quantitative job demands and low social support, but not job control, were associated with future disability pension also after controlling for age, year of interview, socio demographic conditions, and physical work factors. An increase in risk was also noticeable among nursing professionals and care assistants who reported an active job in combination with low social support. An increased risk for disability pension due to mental diagnosis was found among care assistants who reported high job demands. In all other occupations, low social support was associated with an increased risk for disability pension under any condition of job strain (high strain, low strain, active, and passive jobs).

Conclusion: Based on the results we conclude that high quantitative job demands and poor social support are predictors of future disability pension.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2019. Vol. 93, p. 12-20
Keywords [en]
disability pension, psychosocial work conditions, nurses, health care workers
National Category
Psychology
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-167734DOI: 10.1016/j.ijnurstu.2018.10.009ISI: 000468710200002OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-167734DiVA, id: diva2:1301544
Available from: 2019-04-02 Created: 2019-04-02 Last updated: 2019-06-24Bibliographically approved

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Leineweber, ConstanzeAronsson, Gunnar
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