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Pleistocene glacial history of the New Zealand subantarctic islands
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Number of Authors: 192019 (English)In: Climate of the Past, ISSN 1814-9324, E-ISSN 1814-9332, Vol. 15, no 2, p. 423-448Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The New Zealand subantarctic islands of Auckland and Campbell, situated between the subtropical front and the Antarctic Convergence in the Pacific sector of the Southern Ocean, provide valuable terrestrial records from a globally important climatic region. Whilst the islands show clear evidence of past glaciation, the timing and mechanisms behind Pleistocene environmental and climate changes remain uncertain. Here we present a multidisciplinary study of the islands-including marine and terrestrial geomorphological surveys, extensive analyses of sedimentary sequences, a comprehensive dating programme, and glacier flow line modelling-to investigate multiple phases of glaciation across the islands. We find evidence that the Auckland Islands hosted a small ice cap 384 000 +/- 26 000 years ago (384 +/- 26 ka), most likely during Marine Isotope Stage 10, a period when the subtropical front was reportedly north of its present-day latitude by several degrees, and consistent with hemispheric-wide glacial expansion. Flow line modelling constrained by field evidence suggests a more restricted glacial period prior to the LGM that formed substantial valley glaciers on the Campbell and Auckland Islands around 72-62 ka. Despite previous interpretations that suggest the maximum glacial extent occurred in the form of valley glaciation at the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM; similar to 21 ka), our combined approach suggests minimal LGM glaciation across the New Zealand subantarctic islands and that no glaciers were present during the Antarctic Cold Reversal (ACR; similar to 15-13 ka). Instead, modelling implies that despite a regional mean annual air temperature depression of similar to 5 degrees C during the LGM, a combination of high seasonality and low precipitation left the islands incapable of sustaining significant glaciation. We suggest that northwards expansion of winter sea ice during the LGM and subsequent ACR led to precipitation starvation across the middle to high latitudes of the Southern Ocean, resulting in restricted glaciation of the subantarctic islands.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2019. Vol. 15, no 2, p. 423-448
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Earth and Related Environmental Sciences
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URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-167471DOI: 10.5194/cp-15-423-2019ISI: 000461282600001OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-167471DiVA, id: diva2:1301945
Available from: 2019-04-03 Created: 2019-04-03 Last updated: 2019-04-03Bibliographically approved

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Hutchinson, David K.
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