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Calling in the CaValry-Toxoplasma gondii Hijacks GABAergic Signaling and Voltage-Dependent Calcium Channel Signaling for Trojan horse-Mediated Dissemination
Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Molecular Biosciences, The Wenner-Gren Institute.
Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Molecular Biosciences, The Wenner-Gren Institute.
Number of Authors: 22019 (English)In: Frontiers in Cellular and Infection Microbiology, E-ISSN 2235-2988, Vol. 9, article id 61Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Dendritic cells (DCs) are regarded as the gatekeepers of the immune system but can also mediate systemic dissemination of the obligate intracellular parasite Toxoplasma gondii. Here, we review the current knowledge on how T. gondii hijacks the migratory machinery of DCs and microglia. Shortly after active invasion by the parasite, infected cells synthesize and secrete the neurotransmitter gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and activate GABA-A receptors, which sets on a hypermigratory phenotype in parasitized DCs in vitro and in vivo. The signaling molecule calcium plays a central role for this migratory activation as signal transduction following GABAergic activation ismediated via the L-type voltage-dependent calcium channel (L-VDCC) subtype Ca(V)1.3. These studies have revealed that DCs possess a GABA/L-VDCC/Ca(V)1.3 motogenic signaling axis that triggers migratory activation upon T. gondii infection. Moreover, GABAergic migration can cooperate with chemotactic responses. Additionally, the parasite-derived protein Tg14-3-3 has been associated with hypermigration of DCs andmicroglia. We discuss the interference of T. gondii infection with host cell signaling pathways that regulate migration. Altogether, T. gondii hijacks non-canonical signaling pathways in infected immune cells to modulate their migratory properties, and thereby promote its own dissemination.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2019. Vol. 9, article id 61
Keywords [en]
apicomplexa, CNS infection, dendritic cell, microglia, motility, GABA receptor
National Category
Biological Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-167583DOI: 10.3389/fcimb.2019.00061ISI: 000461821300003OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-167583DiVA, id: diva2:1301986
Available from: 2019-04-03 Created: 2019-04-03 Last updated: 2019-04-03Bibliographically approved

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