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Social integration and alcohol consumption among older people: A four-year follow-up of a Swedish national sample
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Aging Research Center (ARC), (together with KI).
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Aging Research Center (ARC), (together with KI). Dalarna University, Sweden.
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Aging Research Center (ARC), (together with KI).
Number of Authors: 32019 (English)In: Drug And Alcohol Dependence, ISSN 0376-8716, E-ISSN 1879-0046, Vol. 196, p. 40-45Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Today's older people drink more alcohol than earlier cohorts of older people. Social integration has been identified as an important factor for older people's drinking, but the association is complex. This study investigates both high and low levels of social integration and their associations with longitudinal patterns of alcohol consumption among older women and men.

Methods: Longitudinal nationally representative data of older Swedish women and men aged over 65 - the Swedish Level of Living Survey (LNU) and Swedish Panel Study of Living Conditions of the Oldest Old (SWEOLD) - from 2010/2011 and 2014 (n = 1048). Associations between social contacts and social activities at baseline and longitudinal patterns of drinking frequency were examined with multinomial logistic regression analyses.

Results: Men reported drinking alcohol more often than women, but the most common drinking frequency among both women and men was to drink monthly or less. Drinking habits were generally stable over time. People with high levels of social activity at baseline were more likely to have a stable daily or weekly drinking frequency or increased drinking frequency over the four-year follow-up period, particularly women. People with low levels of social contacts and/or social activities were less likely to have a stable daily or weekly drinking frequency, compared to people in the low and stable drinking frequency group.

Conclusions: Alcohol consumption is embedded in a social context, older people drink in social situations and social integration predicts continued drinking patterns.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2019. Vol. 196, p. 40-45
Keywords [en]
Alcohol, Social integration, Social context, Older adults, Change
National Category
Substance Abuse Gerontology, specialising in Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-167648DOI: 10.1016/j.drugalcdep.2018.12.011ISI: 000459519900006PubMedID: 30660938OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-167648DiVA, id: diva2:1302919
Available from: 2019-04-08 Created: 2019-04-08 Last updated: 2019-04-08Bibliographically approved

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Citation style
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