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Serum Insulin and Cognitive Performance in Older Adults: A Longitudinal Study
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Aging Research Center (ARC), (together with KI). Ulm University Hospital, Germany.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-7477-7942
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Number of Authors: 102019 (English)In: American Journal of Medicine, ISSN 0002-9343, E-ISSN 1555-7162, Vol. 132, no 3, p. 367-373Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose

The aim of this study was to examine the association of serum glucose, insulin, and insulin resistance with cognitive functioning 7 years later in a longitudinal population-based study of Finnish older adults.

Methods

Serum glucose and insulin were measured at baseline in 269 dementia-free individuals aged 65-79 years, from the Cardiovascular Risk Factors, Aging, and Dementia (CAIDE) study. Insulin resistance was estimated with the homeostasis model assessment (HOMA-IR). Participants were reexamined 7 years later, and global cognition, episodic memory, executive functioning, verbal expression, and psychomotor speed were assessed, both at baseline and at follow-up. Multiple linear regression was used to investigate the associations with cognitive performance at follow-up, after adjusting for several potential confounders, including common vascular risk factors.

Results

In the multivariable-adjusted linear regression models, no associations of insulin resistance with cognitive functioning were observed. After excluding 19 incident dementia cases, higher baseline HOMA-IR values were related to worse performance in global cognition (beta [standard error (SE)] -.050 [0.02]; P =.043) and psychomotor speed (beta [SE] -.064 [. 03]; P = [.043]) 7 years later. Raised serum insulin levels were associated with lower scores on global cognition (b [SE] -.054 [.03]; P =.045) and tended to relate to poorer performance in psychomotor speed (beta [SE] -.061 [.03]; P =.070).

Conclusions

Serum insulin and insulin resistance may be independent predictors of cognitive performance 7 years later in elderly individuals without dementia. Randomized controlled trials are needed to determine this issue.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2019. Vol. 132, no 3, p. 367-373
Keywords [en]
Cognition, Dementia, Insulin, Insulin resistance
National Category
Endocrinology and Diabetes
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-167639DOI: 10.1016/j.amjmed.2018.11.013ISI: 000459911500034PubMedID: 30502316OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-167639DiVA, id: diva2:1303077
Available from: 2019-04-08 Created: 2019-04-08 Last updated: 2019-04-08Bibliographically approved

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