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Intact innervation is essential for diet-induced recruitment of brown adipose tissue
Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Molecular Biosciences, The Wenner-Gren Institute. University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Germany.
Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Molecular Biosciences, The Wenner-Gren Institute.
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Number of Authors: 52019 (English)In: American Journal of Physiology. Endocrinology and Metabolism, ISSN 0193-1849, E-ISSN 1522-1555, Vol. 316, no 3, p. E487-E503Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The possibility that recruitment and activation of brown adipose tissue (BAT) thermogenesis could be beneficial for curtailing obesity development in humans prompts a need for a better understanding of the control of these processes [that are often referred to collectively as diet-induced thermogenesis (DIT)]. Dietary conditions are associated with large changes in blood-borne factors that could be responsible for BAT recruitment, but BAT is also innervated by the sympathetic nervous system. To examine the significance of the innervation for DIT recruitment, we surgically denervated the largest BAT depot, i.e., the interscapular BAT depot in mice and exposed the mice at thermoneutrality to a high-fat diet versus a chow diet. Denervation led to an alteration in feeding pattern but did not lead to enhanced obesity, but obesity was achieved with a lower food intake, as denervation increased metabolic efficiency. Conclusively. denervation totally abolished the diet-induced increase in total UCP1 protein levels observed in the intact mice, whereas basal UCP1 expression was not dependent on innervation. The denervation of interscapular BAT did not discernably hyper-recruit other BAT depots, and no UCP1 protein could be detected in the principally browning-competent inguinal white adipose tissue depot under any of the examined conditions. We conclude that intact innervation is essential for diet-induced thermogenesis and that circulating factors cannot by themselves initiate recruitment of brown adipose tissue under obesogenic conditions. Therefore, the processes that link food intake and energy storage to activation of the nervous system are those of significance for the further understanding of diet-induced thermogenesis.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2019. Vol. 316, no 3, p. E487-E503
Keywords [en]
brown adipose tissue, denervation, diet-induced thermogenesis, obesity, uncoupling protein 1
National Category
Physiology Endocrinology and Diabetes
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-167621DOI: 10.1152/ajpendo.00443.2018ISI: 000460673100013PubMedID: 30576247OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-167621DiVA, id: diva2:1304375
Available from: 2019-04-12 Created: 2019-04-12 Last updated: 2019-04-12Bibliographically approved

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Fischer, Alexander W.Cannon, BarbaraNedergaard, Jan
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