Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Body mass index in early pregnancy and future risk of severe liver disease: a population-based cohort study
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-0203-7977
Show others and affiliations
Number of Authors: 72019 (English)In: Alimentary Pharmacology and Therapeutics, ISSN 0269-2813, E-ISSN 1365-2036, Vol. 49, no 6, p. 789-796Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background

In young men, high body mass index (BMI) has been linked to liver disease later in life, but it is unclear if this also applies to women.

Aim

To study the association between BMI early in life and development of liver disease later in life in women.

Methods

We obtained data on early pregnancy BMI from 1 139 458 Swedish women between 1992 and 2015. National registers were used to ascertain incident severe liver disease, defined as cirrhosis, decompensated liver disease (hepatocellular carcinoma, oesophageal varices, hepatorenal syndrome or hepatic encephalopathy) or liver failure. A Cox regression model was used to investigate associations of BMI with incident severe liver disease adjusting for maternal age, calendar year, country of birth, smoking, civil status and education.

Results

During an average follow-up of 13.8 years, 774 women developed severe liver disease. Compared to women with a low normal BMI (18.5-22.4), an increased risk of severe liver disease was found in women with BMI between 22.5 and 24.9 kg/m(2) (adjusted hazard ratio [aHR] 1.25, 95% CI 1.04-1.50), 25.0 and 29.9 kg/m(2) (aHR 1.27, 95% CI 1.05-1.53) and BMI >= 30 kg/m(2) (aHR 1.77, 95% CI 1.40-2.24). When examining BMI as a continuous variable, the aHR increased by 4% per kg/m(2) (95% CI 1.02-1.05). A diagnosis of diabetes was associated with an increased risk of severe liver disease independent of baseline BMI.

Conclusion

A high BMI early in life in women is associated with a dose-dependent, increased risk for future severe liver disease.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2019. Vol. 49, no 6, p. 789-796
National Category
Gastroenterology and Hepatology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-167638DOI: 10.1111/apt.15162ISI: 000459827800015PubMedID: 30714185OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-167638DiVA, id: diva2:1304441
Available from: 2019-04-12 Created: 2019-04-12 Last updated: 2020-01-23Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text in DiVA

Other links

Publisher's full textPubMed

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Hagström, HannesHöijer, JonasAndreasson, AnnaLudvigsson, Jonas F.
By organisation
Stress Research Institute
In the same journal
Alimentary Pharmacology and Therapeutics
Gastroenterology and Hepatology

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

doi
pubmed
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
pubmed
urn-nbn
Total: 53 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf