Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Year-Round In Situ Measurements of Arctic Low-Level Clouds: Microphysical Properties and Their Relationships With Aerosols
Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Environmental Science and Analytical Chemistry.
Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Environmental Science and Analytical Chemistry.
Show others and affiliations
Number of Authors: 122019 (English)In: Journal of Geophysical Research - Atmospheres, ISSN 2169-897X, E-ISSN 2169-8996, Vol. 124, no 3, p. 1798-1822Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Two years of continuous in situ measurements of Arctic low-level clouds have been made at the Mount Zeppelin Observatory (78 degrees 56N, 11 degrees 53E), in Ny-angstrom lesund, Spitsbergen. The monthly median value of the cloud particle number concentration (N-c) showed a clear seasonal variation: Its maximum appeared in May-July (658cm(-3)), and it remained low between October and March (87cm(-3)). At temperatures warmer than 0 degrees C, a clear correlation was found between the hourly N-c values and the number concentrations of aerosols with dry diameters larger than 70nm (N-70), which are proxies for cloud condensation nuclei (CCN). When clouds were detected at temperatures colder than 0 degrees C, some of the data followed the summertime N-c to N-70 relationship, while other data showed systematically lower N-c values. The lidar-derived depolarization ratios suggested that the former (CCN-controlled) and latter (CCN-uncontrolled) data generally corresponded to clouds consisting of supercooled water droplets and those containing ice particles, respectively. The CCN-controlled data persistently appeared throughout the year at Zeppelin. The aerosol-cloud interaction index (ACI=dlnN(c)/(3dlnN(70))) for the CCN-controlled data showed high sensitivities to aerosols both in the summer (clean air) and winter-spring (Arctic haze) seasons (0.220.03 and 0.250.02, respectively). The air parcel model calculations generally reproduced these values. The threshold diameters of aerosol activation (D-act), which account for the N-c of the CCN-controlled data, were as low as 30-50nm when N-70 was less than 30cm(-3), suggesting that new particle formation can affect Arctic cloud microphysics.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2019. Vol. 124, no 3, p. 1798-1822
Keywords [en]
Arctic, cloud, aerosol, climate
National Category
Earth and Related Environmental Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-167528DOI: 10.1029/2018JD029802ISI: 000459377000035OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-167528DiVA, id: diva2:1305956
Available from: 2019-04-20 Created: 2019-04-20 Last updated: 2019-04-20Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text in DiVA

Other links

Publisher's full text

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Ström, JohanTunved, Peter
By organisation
Department of Environmental Science and Analytical Chemistry
In the same journal
Journal of Geophysical Research - Atmospheres
Earth and Related Environmental Sciences

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

doi
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
urn-nbn
Total: 21 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf