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Youth Well-Being Contextualized: Perceptions of Swedish Fathers
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Child and Youth Studies.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-9717-723X
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Child and Youth Studies.
2019 (English)In: Child and Youth Care Forum, ISSN 1053-1890, E-ISSN 1573-3319, Vol. 48, no 6, p. 773-795Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Fathers can have a critical role to play in supporting the well-being of youth. However, little is known about how fathers perceive youth well-being. The Five Cs model of positive youth development was the theoretical starting point of this study, in part due to this framework’s focus on the importance of bi-directional, person–context relations (Geldhof et al., in: Molenaar, Lerner, Newell (eds) Handbook of developmental systems theory and methodology, Guilford Press, New York, 2014). Questions posed in the present study were derived from the 4-H study of positive youth development (Lerner et al. in J Early Adolesc 25(1):17–71, 2005), which is rooted in the Five Cs model.

Objective: The present study explored themes and patterns of meaning in descriptive information from fathers about youth well-being.

Method: An inductive–deductive approach to thematic analysis was used to examine responses to open-ended survey questions from 201 Swedish fathers regarding youth well-being.

Results: Based on the fathers’ reports four themes were identified: cognitive well-being, emotional and psychological well-being, physical well-being, and social well-being. While some sub-components of these themes have been identified in earlier literature, new sub-components were also found in each domain of youth well-being (i.e., cognitive, emotional/psychological, physical, social).

Conclusions: These findings suggest that the understanding of youth well-being is contextual and multi-faceted, and that fathers’ perceptions can be important to consider in future research as they may further our insight into the rich and nuanced characteristics of positive youth development in diverse contexts.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2019. Vol. 48, no 6, p. 773-795
Keywords [en]
Youth, Development, Well-being, Fathers, Sweden
National Category
Social Sciences Interdisciplinary Psychology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-168163DOI: 10.1007/s10566-019-09508-6ISI: 000490003600001OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-168163DiVA, id: diva2:1306349
Available from: 2019-04-23 Created: 2019-04-23 Last updated: 2019-11-11Bibliographically approved

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Mansoory, ShahramFerrer-Wreder, LauraTrost, Kari
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