Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
A prelude to the dual provider family - The changing role of female labor force participation and occupational field on fertility outcomes during the baby boom in Sweden 1900-60
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology. Umeå University, Sweden.
Number of Authors: 22019 (English)In: The History of the Family, ISSN 1081-602X, E-ISSN 1873-5398, Vol. 24, no 1, p. 149-173Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

By investigating changes in the association between women's socioeconomic status, labor market activity and fertility outcomes during the Swedish baby boom 1900-60 this study reaches three main conclusions. First, the results show that a convergence of fertility behavior occurred across female socioeconomic strata during the peak baby boom period in the 1940s and 1950s in terms of a strong two child norm. Second, the negative socio-economic gradient of fertility found in Sweden before the baby boom declined sharply among women who came of age during the 1940s and 1950s, as white-collar women increased their fertility more than all the other strata. Third, this was especially the case for women engaged in the so called 'caring professions' that exhibit the largest changes in behavior. The pattern found in contemporary Western contexts where women in healthcare and education have a substantially higher fertility was thus formed in Sweden already during the 1940s and 1950s. The empirical finding fit with the interpretation that middle-class women employed in the public sector experienced stronger reductions in constraints to family formation compared to women employed in the private sector. We propose that the pronatalist polices implemented in the 1930s and 1940s, especially the extensive improvements in employment protection implemented for women who got married or became pregnant in the late 1930s in Sweden, is one important factor to consider when we try to understand why especially women employed in the public sector in education and healthcare increased their fertility more than other groups.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2019. Vol. 24, no 1, p. 149-173
Keywords [en]
Fertility, baby boom, female labor force participation, caring professions, Sweden
National Category
Sociology Economic History History
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-168457DOI: 10.1080/1081602X.2018.1556721ISI: 000462901600007OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-168457DiVA, id: diva2:1313223
Available from: 2019-05-02 Created: 2019-05-02 Last updated: 2019-05-02Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text in DiVA

Other links

Publisher's full text

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Sandström, Glenn
By organisation
Department of Sociology
In the same journal
The History of the Family
SociologyEconomic HistoryHistory

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

doi
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
urn-nbn
Total: 121 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf